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RE: ACZA treated wood

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I believe that the cautionary note regarded mixing stainless steel fasteners
with galvanized steel. Due to differences in galvanic potential, stainless
steel tends to increase the rate of consumption of galvanizing. The effect
is not as severe when using stainless steel with carbon steel. (Ref. AISI
and Nickel Development Institute data on stainless steel fasteners). 

In practice, I have seen stainless steel fasteners frequently detailed to be
used with galvanized steel pipe supports, and yet I haven't heard of
significant problems. Thus, reality doesn't seem to be as severe as theory.
But I try to avoid stainless with galvanizing when possible. 

William C. Sherman, PE 
(Bill Sherman) 
CDM, Denver, CO
Phone: 303-298-1311
Fax: 303-293-8236
email: shermanwc(--nospam--at)cdm.com


> -----Original Message-----
> From: Jordan Truesdell, PE [mailto:seaint(--nospam--at)truesdellengineering.com] 
> Sent: Tuesday, June 08, 2004 3:21 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: RE: ACZA treated wood
> 
> 
> I found those articles interesting, but wondered about the 
> cautionary note 
> for mixing stainless fasteners with carbon steel.  I guess I 
> was under the 
> impression that the natural passivity of 300/400 stainless 
> was sufficient 
> to avoid problems, for example when fastening ACQ/ACZA (or 
> any other wood, 
> for that matter) to cold formed framing with stainless 
> fasteners. Anyone 
> care to expand?
> 
> At 05:03 PM 6/8/2004 -0400, you wrote:
> >The April 2004 issue of Structural Engineer magazine had a 
> good pair of 
> >articles on this subject under the heading: "Corrosive 
> Conundrum, The 
> >Unintended Risks of Eliminating Harmful Wood Preservatives". One 
> >article recommends hot-dip galvanized steel with extra thickness of 
> >galvanizing
> >(G185) or stainless steel for fasteners and connectors. It 
> states that CCA
> >treated wood is approximately twice as corrosive as 
> untreated wood and the
> >new preservatives are approximately twice as corrosive as 
> CCA (or 4 times as
> >corrosive as untreated wood).
> >
> >William C. Sherman, PE
> >(Bill Sherman)
> >CDM, Denver, CO
> >Phone: 303-298-1311
> >Fax: 303-293-8236
> >email: shermanwc(--nospam--at)cdm.com
> >*** ******* ****** ****** ********
> 
> Jordan Truesdell, PE
> 
> 
> 
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