Need a book? Engineering books recommendations...

Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

Re: [SPAM] - Re: Definition of Unstable ===>>what SALVADORI has to say about STABILITY

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
>From Amazon.com:
******************************************************************************
Why Buildings Fall Down: How Structures Fail
by Matthys Levy, Mario Salvadori, Kevin Woest 

Paperback: 336 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.89 x 9.18 x 6.14 
Publisher: W.W. Norton & Company; Reprint edition (1994) 
ISBN: 039331152X 

First Published: 1992, WW Norton, New York and London
******************************************************************************
Why Buildings Stand Up: The Strength of Architecture
by Mario Salvadori

Paperback: 328 pages ; Dimensions (in inches): 0.93 x 9.19 x 6.13 
Publisher: W.W. Norton & Company; Reissue edition (February 18, 2002) 
ISBN: 0393306763

First Published: 1980, WW Norton, New York and London
******************************************************************************



On Wed, 28 Jul 2004 08:59:13 +0300, Syed Faiz <sfaiz(--nospam--at)saudioger.com> wrote:
> Kieran:
> 
> I don't have either of thema and would like to buy them for my personal library. May I then request you to post details about this book; meaning publisher name, its edition and date & place of its publication?
> 
> Thanx in advance.
> 
> Syed Faiz Ahmad; MEngg, MASCE
> Senior Structural Engineer
> Saudi Oger Ltd
> P.O. Box: 1449
> Riyadh-11431
> Saudi Arabia
> Cell: +966-508-169304
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Kieran K-S [mailto:kieranks(--nospam--at)gmail.com]
> Sent: Tuesday, July 27, 2004 9:32 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: [SPAM] - Re: Definition of Unstable ===>>what SALVADORI has to
> say about STABILITY. - Bayesian Filter detected spam
> 
> Levi and Salvadori's "Why Buildings Fall Down" is a great lay persons
> reference book on structural failures, and it describes many types of
> failure.  One chapter is devoted to the effects of unstable soils.
> Another deals with engineering and the law.  The appendix contains a
> very good description of structural systems.  This chapter mentions a
> case in which some houses built on top of a hill of clayish soil came
> home to find their homes at the bottom of the slope.
> 
> An excerpt on Equilibrium: "A structure not only must be stable - that
> is, not be subjected to large displacements - .... it must be in
> equilibrium (in balance).  This requirement implies, of course, that
> each element of a whole structure must also be in equilibrium so that
> the structure will stay together."
> 
> I highly recommended book to anyone interested in structural failure
> or stability for any reason.  The companion book "Why Buildings Stand
> Up" is also excellent.  Many engineers I know have both in their
> libraries.
> 
> Kieran K-S
> 
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Syed Faiz <sfaiz(--nospam--at)saudioger.com>
> Date: Tue, 27 Jul 2004 19:53:29 +0300
> Subject: RE:Definition of Unstable ===>>what SALVADORI has to say
> about STABILITY.
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> 
> Stan:
> 
> I know you already have been swamped by a host lot of stuffs vis-a-vis
> the definition of "unstable", "stable" , instability or "stability'
> and I think you probably do not need any more of the same.
> 
> However, I was browsing through a classical book that I have with me,
> entitled, "Structure in Architecture" by: Mario Salvadori et al. I
> found something interesting related to your query per se  in the same
> and thought may be I should share the same with you and others on this
> list.
> 
> This is what Salvadori has to say about stability and I QUOTE:
> 
> "The requirement of 'Rigid Body' stability is concerned with the
> danger of unacceptable motions of the building as a whole. When a tall
> building is acted upon by a hurricane wind and is not properly rooted
> in the ground or balanced by its own weight, it may be topple over
> without disintegrating. The building is said to be
> UNSTABLE in
> ROTATION. This is particularly true of tall narrow buildings, as one
> may prove by blowing on a slim cardboard box, on a rough surface.
> 
> The danger of
> ROTATIONAL INSTABILITY is also present when a building is not 'well
> balanced' or is supported on a soil of uneven resistance
> <may be this one is more appropriate to your case, being founded on
> expansive soil>. If the soil under the building settles uevenly, the
> building may
> ROTATE, as the Leaning Tower of Pisa still does, and may eventually
> topple over. <UNQUOTE>.
> 
> I hope this is of some value to you or to any on this list. Best regards to all.
> 
> Syed Faiz Ahmad; MEngg, MASCE
> Senior Structural Engineer
> Saudi Oger Ltd
> P.O. Box: 1449
> Riyadh-11431
> Saudi Arabia
> Cell: +966-508-169304
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Caldwell, Stan [mailto:scaldwell(--nospam--at)halff.com]
> Sent: Monday, July 26, 2004 10:58 PM
> To: SEAINT Listserv
> Subject: [SPAM] - Definition of Unstable - Bayesian Filter detected spam
> 
> Once again, I find myself employed as an expert witness in the defense
> of a fellow structural engineer.
> 
> Background:
> 
> A concrete tiltwall industrial building was constructed in 1976 and
> expanded in 1991.  Due primarily to differential heaving of expansive
> clay soils, the building suffered substantial distress over a period
> of many years.  By 1999, the distress had progressed to a point where
> the building owner brought in three separate structural engineers to
> observe the condition of the building.  All three engineers
> independently concluded that they observed significant structural
> problems and recommended further testing, repair and monitoring
> programs.  The owner apparently ignored these recommendations, and
> instead proceeded to sell the building to the tenant in 2000.  Less
> than a year later, the roof collapsed.  An insurance company
> subsequently paid a claim well in excess of $2 million, and is now
> subrogating against (suing) all three engineers.  The allegations
> principally are that the engineers:  (1) failed to include warnings
> about the immediate need for repairs, (2) failed to include warnings
> about life-safety issues, and (3) failed to report that collapse was
> imminent.
> 
> Key Question:
> 
> The engineer that I am defending wrote a two-page report summarizing
> the observed damage and recommending specific repairs, tests, and
> monitoring.  Prior to a list of nine items, one key sentence reads:
> "Please find listed below items that need to be completed immediately
> and prior to any other investigations."  In my opinion, this sentence
> directly refutes the first allegation.  Another key sentence reads:
> "It is my opinion that the building is relatively unstable at this
> time with differential floor slab and wall panels movements noted."
> In my opinion, this sentence indirectly refutes the third allegation
> because I consider an unstable building to be a building where the
> risk of potential collapse is imminent.  What I need to support this
> opinion is a good written definition of "unstable".  Preferably, I
> would like to be able to refer to a well-written paragraph in a widely
> recognized text or other reference.  Any suggestions?
> 
> Regards,
> 
> Stan R. Caldwell, P.E.
> Dallas, Texas
> 
> ******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
> *   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
> *
> *   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers
> *   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To
> *   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
> *
> *   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
> *
> *   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you
> *   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted
> *   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web
> *   site at: http://www.seaint.org
> ******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ********
> 
> ******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
> *   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
> *
> *   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers
> *   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To
> *   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
> *
> *   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
> *
> *   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you
> *   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted
> *   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web
> *   site at: http://www.seaint.org
> ******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ********
>

******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
* 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org 
******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ********