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Re: RE: Dunnage

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According to "Merriam-Webster Online" 

Dunnage is defined as "loose materials used to support and protect 
cargo in a ship's hold; also : padding in a shipping container."  Looks 
like old world shipping jargon is migrating into construction with a 
similar meaning.



----- Original Message -----
From: Jim Wilson <wilsonengineers(--nospam--at)yahoo.com>
Date: Wednesday, September 1, 2004 10:15 am
Subject: RE: Dunnage

> Interesting...  I don't recall hearing it specifically, but after 
> working construction in Boston for a number of years, I came away 
> with the impression that dunnage was temporary material support, 
> be it steel or wood.  I also picture it as a lesser cousin to 
> shoring, such as blocking to hold something in place until a 
> connection is made.
> 
> But now that you mention it and after being in PA for a couple of 
> years, I have been hearing mechanical guys talking about dunnage 
> used to support HVAC units on the roof.  I thought they were just 
> misinformed... 
> Jim
> 
> "Stuart, Matthew" <mstuart(--nospam--at)schoordepalma.com> wrote:
> 
> 
> So if people up in New England think dunnage is wood also, where 
> did NJ get the wrong idea?
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: HEATH MITCHELL [mailto:hmitchell(--nospam--at)pcsainc.com]
> Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2004 2:31 PM
> To: Stuart, Matthew
> Subject: RE: Dunnage
> 
> 
> 
> I grew up in New Hampshire and was an ironworker for a while (New 
> England states) and I?ve only heard ?dunnage? used as you describe 
> for the south ? timbers used to keep something off of the ground 
> (or to separate items in a pile). 
> 
> 
> 
> Heath Mitchell, P.E.
> 
> Project Engineer
> 
> Putnam Collins Scott Associates
> 
> Phone 253-383-2797 Fax 253-383-1557
> 
> hmitchell(--nospam--at)pcsainc.com
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Stuart, Matthew [mailto:mstuart(--nospam--at)schoordepalma.com] 
> Sent: Tuesday, August 31, 2004 10:52 AM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: Dunnage
> 
> 
> 
> In my experience, in the south the term dunnage was most often 
> used to describe loose timber posts that precast products, steel 
> members and other similar materials were temporary stored on top 
> of.  In the northeast dunnage is used to describe even the most 
> elaborate steel frames constructed on the top of a roof to support 
> mechanical equipment.  What has everybody else's experience been 
> with the term dunnage?  I see that the Dictionary of Architecture 
> and Construction (McGraw Hill) defines dunnage as it is commonly 
> used in the northeast.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>        	
> ---------------------------------
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> 


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