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RE: Minimum steel in slabs on ground

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The fibermesh rep here, when travelling with the local Readymix guy, told me that the fibrillated poly was good during the curing process (overall shrinkage & spider), but was pretty much useless after that.

I did a small trial elevated slab (personal project) with a 4000psi LW mix w/ steel&fiber reinforcement - ~16'x18'. There were no control joists and no curing agent or poly tarping was used. It rained/drizzled/misted for two days after the placement. During placement, it was sunny, temps were 85-70F, winds in the 5-15mph range, humidity was moderate. The completed slab, approx 2.75-3.00" thick, has developed a single .030-.040" crack over a line of shear studs which were too close to the finished surface (the batch plant shorted me concrete - imagine that). No other cracks have developed in two years of weathered exposure.

On a non-technical note, I learned that you should never try to finish more concrete than you can mix by hand unless you do it for a living ;-)

At 06:42 PM 10/15/2004 -0700, you wrote:
Bill -
Well from what the Fibermesh representatives that I worked with said, their
product is equivalent to WWR in every respect...except the being stepped on
and becoming ineffective part.  Steel fibers can be added along with the
fiberglass fibers, increasing the tensile capacity of the slab to something
you might be more comfortable with.

Eli Grassley
PSM Engineers
Seattle

Jordan Truesdell, PE



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