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RE: wood framing - commercial structures

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Jen:

 

Be sure to check construction type before proceeding…

 

BOCA, for example, does not allow Type IV construction for a four story building.

 

 

Regards,

 

 

David L. Fisher SE PE

Fisher + partners

372 West Ontario

Chicago 60610

 

312.573.1701

312.573.1726 fax

 

312.622.0409 mobile

 

www.fpse.com


From: Gary Ehrlich [mailto:GEhrlich(--nospam--at)mcecorp.com]
Sent: Friday, October 22, 2004 9:03 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: wood framing - commercial structures

 

Jen,

 

2x6 sounds right to me.  I've done several four-story wood structures (apartments and dorms) and needed 2x6 for my first- and second-floor load bearing walls.  This was using the exterior walls and the interior corridor walls as bearing (typical central corridor with units on each side).  The one place an architect really painted me into a corner and stuck me with 2x4's I think I ended up with 2x4's at 6" or 8" O.C.

 

Gary

-----Original Message-----
From: Jen Wadsworth [mailto:JWadsworth(--nospam--at)TricoEngineering.com]
Sent: Friday, October 22, 2004 9:03 AM
To: 'seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org'
Subject: wood framing - commercial structures

3 – the contractor and owner want 2x4 stud walls all around. Our walls (load bearing) are currently 2x6 stud walls for the first two levels, and 2x4 for the top two. This was decided from Table 2308.9.1 from IBC 2000.  Is there something I’m missing here, or am I correct in saying we need 2x6 walls to support 3 floors and a roof?