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RE: wood framing - commercial structures

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The framers that I have talked to often request designs with #2 lumber for stud use for the even finish reasons that you mention, but I haven't heard requests for LSL or PSL studs yet.  I have used LSL or PSL studs in cases where the heights are much greater than typical, such as the 18' cases you mention.  I will have to ask about the pricing differences next time a talk to a framer on a big job.  

Paul Crocker, PE, SE

>>> "Dennis Wish" <dennis.wish(--nospam--at)verizon.net> 10/22/04 11:24AM >>>
Paul, 
If you are doubling up your lumber, then why not consider using Timberstrand
or Parallam studs. I think you would save money in both materials and
finish. As manufactured lumber, you save labor costs in finish as you won't
have to shim the studs to get a smooth, vertical finish on the gypsum
sheathing. 
The down side is that nailing into Timberstrand or Parallam studs can be
difficult as I've been told. I did a small church where the sanctuary was
done with 18' studs and the contractor loved the materials because there was
little waste and it was easy to finish. However, he did complain about nail
penetrations being very difficult especially if hand nailed.



Dennis S. Wish, PE


California Professional Engineer

Structural Engineering Consultant

dennis.wish(--nospam--at)verizon.net 

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-----Original Message-----
From: Paul Crocker [mailto:pcrocker(--nospam--at)reidmidd.com] 
Sent: Friday, October 22, 2004 10:14 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org 
Subject: RE: wood framing - commercial structures

"We typically have central load bearing corridors that support the roof and
the floors.  It is often difficult to get 2x4s to work in the corridor
without going with double 2x4s at 16" on center."

I have done a number of tall wood frame buildings, too, and have had the
same experience.  Double 2x4 at 12" or 16" on center are not uncommon.  You
can also look at introducing 3x4s to get a little extra capacity.  I doubt
that would work for the exterior with wind loads, but the architects usually
want 2x6 on the outside for insulations thickness anyway.  Pushing for 2x6
at the interior for the first few levels and 2x4 for the upper levels
doesn't work too well because the unit and corridor dimensions will get
messed up (to use a technical term) by 4" total (2" difference on each side
of the corridor).  4" can be a big deal when exiting layouts and unit
layouts are concerned.  Using double 2x4 at 16" on center looks heavy the
first time you do it, but it may just be the price to pay for going high
with wood.  In the Seattle area, anyway, it happens all the time.  

Paul Crocker, PE, SE


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