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Re: Infilled brick pannels

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Mike,

At least on of the FEMA seismic retrofit publications has some content on
infill wall capacities.  Don't recall which one (I believe either 178 or
273/274 or 310) and I am too lazy at the moment to crack them open and
look.

Regards,

Scott
Adrian, MI


On Fri, 22 Oct 2004, Michael L. Hemstad wrote:

> Bhavin Shah <vmscons(--nospam--at)eth.net> wrote:
>
> "For resisting lateral loads in the Framed Structures are you
> considering the effects of infilled brick panels. If you are
> considering the effects of the same then kindly share your experience
> regarding the following points :
>
> 1. Modelling with the Plate elements or diagonal vertical bracing
>
> 2. What would be the properties of the bracing, if it is modelled as a
> bracing.
>
> 3. Modulus of elasticity for the brick wall
>
> 4. What are the cares to be taken in construction sequence so that
> adequate bond between beam-column & infilled brick wall is created for
> transfering of the lateral loads.
>
> 5. Minimum thickness of the brick wall, for considering the same as
> infilled brick panels.
>
> 6. Other points, if any.
>
>
> Regards,
>
> Bhavin Shah, M.E. Structures
> Design Engineer
> VMS EDS, India.
> bhavin(--nospam--at)vmsconsultants.com"
>
>
>
>
> Bhavin,
> The best, and only, reference I've ever seen for this subject is the
> book "Tall Building Structures" by Bryan Stafford-Smith and Alex Coull,
> published by Wiley in 1991.  ISBN 0-471-51237-0.  They devote an entire
> chapter to the subject, with design equations and everything.  Might be
> just what you're looking for.
>
> As far as our experience, no, we do not consider it.  Quite the
> opposite, we take pains to keep the infill separated from the steel
> sufficiently that it does not act to stiffen the frame.  For severe wind
> loading, this avoids difficult-to-repair damage to the brick; for
> seismic design, the relatively brittle infill would stiffen the frame
> enough to gather huge forces, then explode.
>
> I could see properly reinforced concrete infill being suitable to
> stiffen panels, but then we would just make the whole building out of
> concrete.
>
> Mike Hemstad, P.E.
> TKDA
> St. Paul, Minnesota
>
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