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RE: STEEL: Q - What is the proper procedure for submitting/approv ing an alternate design?

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"Since they're not my client, and since my client has already paid me ONCE
for the steel design, I don't see why I should oblige them."

 that's your answer right there. Why do we continue to do work that we're
not paid for? You aren't getting paid to calculate a new design. If they
want you to accept something different than what you specified then they
need to provide you with a design, including calcs, for you to review. If
not, they need another engineer's seal. Why you should assume liability for
a design that you didn't do?  

A totally separate issue is the fact that the shop dwgs don't have a seal.
We never accept shop dwgs without an engineer's seal.  We specify this
requirement in our general notes, but it's a standard that's widely
accepted. 

Jen

 -----Original Message-----
From: 	Bill Polhemus [mailto:bill(--nospam--at)polhemus.cc] 
Sent:	Tuesday, November 16, 2004 9:39 AM
To:	seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject:	STEEL: Q - What is the proper procedure for
submitting/approving an alternate design?

Hello, all.

I have a job where the contractor is submitting though his 
fabricator/detailer an alternate design to that which I submitted for 
permit.

In general, I have no problem with this, as long as it meets the design 
requirements. In fact, I sort of enjoy the opportunity to "learn" from a 
fabricator and erector. More'n one way to skin a cat, as we say in these 
parts.

However, when the submittal arrived, it was in the form of ONLY shop 
drawings, no calculations, not even an engineer's seal or "disclaimer" 
attached. Since I'm the EOR, I guess that much is a "gray area," but my 
response to them was "guys, I don't have anything to approve. Please 
send me calculations, etc., so that I can review it for conformance to 
the design requirements."

Their response has been puzzlement. I think that THEY think "h*ll, 
you're an engineer, you oughta know if it's okay or not!" It's almost as 
if they're pulling something out of their design standards and then 
asking me to verify the design adequacy. Since they're not my client, 
and since my client has already paid me ONCE for the steel design, I 
don't see why I should oblige them.

What I need to know is, what is the proper procedure here? I have 
lookeed through the AISC Code of Standard Practice, but I cannot find 
anything that covers this. I have also looked on AISC's website to no 
avail. I would contact their support hotline, but I'm not a member of 
AISC and I figure I could better get a cross-section of real-world 
opinions here.

Thanks.

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