Need a book? Engineering books recommendations...

Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

RE: High Tire Pressure on Concrete slab

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
I'm not disputing that the tire pressure number is in error (900 is VERY
high), but tire pressures for earth-moving equipment isn't a good
comparison.  

The tires for equipment designed to run on earth are intentionally very
large with low pressures and large contact areas to keep from being buried
in the ground.  Even though the equipment itself is extraordinarily heavy
(I've climbed on dump trucks capable of carrying 150 tons in addition to
their own weight, and it was far from the largest piece of equipment that
Caterpillar makes), the earth pressures are rather low.

High-speed interior equipment will have high pressures and small contact
areas to minimize tire flexure and friction.

Non-the-less, 900 psi is extremely high.

---
Jason Kilgore
Leigh & O'Kane, LLC
Kansas City, Missouri
________________________________________
From: Padmanabhan Rajendran [mailto:rakamaka(--nospam--at)yahoo.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, November 16, 2004 11:53 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: High Tire Pressure on Concrete slab

Richard,
 
I suspect that your data is in error.  Find out, from the fork lift
manufacturer, the pressure to which the tires must be inflated. Then the
contact area will be the load on the wheel divided by the tire inflation
pressure. In other words, the contact pressure is, theoretically, equal to
the tire inflation pressure.  
 
For your information, even some of the large Caterpillar earthmoving
equipment have contact pressures less than 50 psi.
 
Rajendran

richard lewis <rlewistx(--nospam--at)juno.com> wrote:
I'm working on the design of a slab for a fork truck that has tire
contact pressure up to 900 psi. This makes for a very small contact
area. The design problem I have for the slab is that the parameters are
"off the chart" for the PCA design method and the WRI design method. The
only one that is "on the chart" is the Core of Engineers method because
it is not based on contact pressure, but axle load and frequency of
traffic.

Are there design standards for the newer fork trucks that high the high
wheel contact pressure and high speed travel? I have used the text
"Designing Floor Slabs on Grade, 2 ed." by Ringo to check these 3
standards mentioned above. The fork truck manufacturer will not give me
any direction for slab design. 

Thanks for your help.

Rich

________________________________________________________________Juno
Platinum $9.95. Juno SpeedBand $14.95.
Sign up for Juno Today at http://www.juno.com!
Look for special offers at Best Buy stores.

******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
* Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
* 
* This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
* Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
* subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
* http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
* Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
* send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
* without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
* site at: http://www.seaint.org 
******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ******** 
________________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
The all-new My Yahoo!  Get yours free! 



******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
* 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org 
******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ********