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RE: CFS gage on drawings

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I generally specify a minimum gage and a maximum stud spacing and
specify final design to be per the Contractor's engineer. As you have
learned, giving specific requirements creates an opportunity for cost
extras. 

Regarding delegated designs, I feel that the specifying engineer should
review the submitted design for general conformance to the specified
requirements, including applied loads, general code compliance,
consistent design approach, etc. However, I would not check the complete
design in detail, since I am less experienced with CFS design - I expect
the PE responsible for the CFS design to be qualified to perform such
work. One option I have started to use is to specify that design
calculations must be checked by a qualified engineer other than the
preparer prior to submittal. This ensures some level of checking before
my general conformance review. 

William C. Sherman, PE 
(Bill Sherman) 
CDM, Denver, CO
Phone: 303-298-1311
Fax: 303-293-8236
email: shermanwc(--nospam--at)cdm.com
 

> -----Original Message-----
> From: bbyrom(--nospam--at)vollmer.com [mailto:bbyrom(--nospam--at)vollmer.com] 
> Sent: Wednesday, December 29, 2004 10:23 AM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: CFS gage on drawings
> 
> I'm am trying to get an idea of what others are doing in 
> practice.  I have completed a couple of jobs where I showed 
> the size and gage of exterior non-loadbearing CFS wall studs 
> in section (or gave the architect a gage for his sections).  
> The contractor bids on the job using that gage, the CFS 
> manufacturer completes the design which changes some of these 
> sizes, and the contractor submits a change order for the 
> difference.  Since I am ultimately not responsible for the 
> final design of these elements, I am leaning towards not 
> giving a gage on drawings in the future.  I assume that this 
> would require a bidding contractor to have the CFS sub do a 
> preliminary design for pricing, but it would relieve me from 
> the responsibility.  Is this standard practice?  What if the 
> architect insists on showing the gage?
> 
> The reason that I ask is that I keep getting burned.  For 
> example, I told an architect that 20 gage 6" studs were 
> adequate behind a brick veneer with 10'
> flr to flr.  I checked the studs for L/600 deflection and 
> bending, and they were fine, but it turns out that there is a 
> requirement in the masonry code for 18 gage min.  Over a 
> large project, the increased cost becomes rather significant.
> 
> Any thoughts are greatly appreciated.
> Brad Byrom
> 
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