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tilt-up stuff...

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I would highly suggest checking out the program PCA Wall, which is specifically for tilt up panel design. It is easy to use and understand and you hit the ground running efficiently. It uses FEA but the results are easy to process, and you can look at your panel and see the stress regions as well as reinforcement so you get an intuitive feel (higher stress at openings for ex). Don't forget to review your standard SOG design to make sure it is ok for whatever you got going on top of it during construction, like the panels themselves or a crane. My old company would thicken up the slabs an inch or two for this reason. Also, you want some good details of the wall to footing, the tie in bar to the slab, the leave-out strip around the edge of the slab at the footing, your joints and slip connections, etc.
 
At least around here, engineers don't do much in terms of detailing, that is left to the tilt contractor and his shop dwgs. I would suggest, especially on jobs with lots of different openings, taking the architectural elevations and strip them down, and draw your additional bars right on there. A few extra sheets of paper is worth the ease of reviewing clear shop dwgs that are done right. Also, the tilt contractor designs his lift plates, as well as extra reinforcement used in lifting, I would not get into that as lifting stresses can be very complicated and I believe there is specialty software for all of that. And every contractor does it a little different. Plus there is tons of liability in that, don't think you would not get drug kicking and screaming into a lawsuit if there was a construction "mishap". This way you draw a line in the sand and you are only responsible for the panels once they are up and properly installed.... 
 
You also may want someone to peer review or QC your first job or two until you get the hang of it, to make sure you have your details and bars shown right. Also , you will need some good general notes on tilt panels. It is a bit tricky at first but once you get into it you will like how much easier it is to make panels work then CMU, even though I am a big CMU fan. Especially if you are in a high wind region. It would seem they would be both good and a liability in a seismic region due to their weight, but then again, same thing with CMU.
 
Finally, we designed our headed stud embeds for joist and beam connections to PCA Volume 5 , and they changed the formulas from earlier versions and we had big problems and had to get creative. So be careful there....
 
 
Andrew Kester, PE
Lake Mary, FL