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Re: Brick veneer on PreEngineered Metal Building

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I used to design PEMB and if we knew about a veneer cladding we would take measures to accomodate the deflection and drift. They may need to put an intermediate column between the rigid frames to limit the girt spans. I would contact the PEMB mfr and discuss what they are planning to do and make sure they know about the brick, since this is a concern to you.



Will Haynes, P.E.




From: ad026(--nospam--at)hwcn.org (Paul Ransom)
Reply-To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Brick veneer on PreEngineered Metal Building
Date: Wed, 19 Jan 2005 09:22:56 -0500

> From: "Rich Lewis" <sea(--nospam--at)lewisengineering.com>

> I have had a request to design a foundation for a PEMB that will have
> metal siding now, with the potential for a brick veneer in the future.

> When I asked how the brick was going to be supported I was told they
> screw wall ties into the metal panel and build the walls.  The eave
> height of the building is 28 feet.
>
> My apprehension is the metal panel wall system is not stiff enough to
> support the masonry veneer.  A wall panel supported by girts at 7 ft. on

> I was told this is common practice.  Now I know just because it is
> common practice doesn't mean it is right.  I would like to know what
> common design recommendations should be made to the steel design and
> wall system to provide an adequate stiff backup in the future.

My first thought is, "why worry about it if you are not responsible for
it." However, I wonder if the PEMB manufacturer has been made aware of
the plan for a future brick veneer (added seismic load, if nothing
else). Frequently, the builder/owner will omit full disclosure to the
PEMB manufacturer to get a lower price. Secondly, the builder (who has
done this a million times before and is always the low bid ...) may not
have advised the owner of the issues. He may believe what he is doing
but he will blame the engineers when something goes wrong.

Typical spans 20' - 25', with 8" cold-formed C or Z spaced at 7' is not
likely to give the stiffness that you believe to be required. Add the
flexibility of the panel, even at the stiffer ribs, and anything could
happen.

Typical PEMB girt: L/60 to L/120
Typical PEMB panel: L/60 to L/120
Cumulative.

--
R. Paul Ransom, P. Eng.
Civil/Structural/Project/International
Burlington, Ontario, Canada
<mailto:ado26(--nospam--at)hwcn.org> <http://www.hwcn.org/~ad026/civil.html>

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