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RE: OFF TOPIC - SE / PE initials

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To add to what Jason and Paul offered...

There are three basic ways that licenses relative to structural
engineering are done in the various states.

1) Most states have only a PE license.  In such states, a SE license does
not exist, so the SE designation is basically meaningless.  Of these
states, so only offer the Civil PE exam for getting your PE license; some
offer both the Civil and Structural I PE exam and you can choose; and in
some states they offer both, but which one you pick can affect you license
some (I believe Arizona is one such state...if you want to do pure
strucutral work, then you take the Struct I exam...please correct me if I
am wrong).  In such states, you would just have a PE after your name.  For
me, I am licensed in Michigan which only has a PE license.  So, in the
"eyes" of Michigan, I can "call" myself "Scott Maxwell, PE".

2) There are a few states that have both a PE and a SE license, but
require you get the PE license prior to getting the SE license (California
and Washington comes to mind).  These states typically have what is
referred to as a Title Act license for the SE license and a Practive Act
for the PE license.  This essentially means that in the licensing board's
eyes, the PE license gets you the ability to practice (structural)
engineering and the SE license gets you the ability to call your self a
structural engineer (i.e. use the title of "Structural Engineer").  It
turns out that it is no so simple typically.  California "confuses" the
issue in that the DSA (Department of the State Architect or some such)
requires all hospitals and schools to be designed by a SE and some local
jurisdictions require buildings over a certain height to be designed by a
SE.  The result of this is that for those who solely practice in such a
state, they will general just put a SE after their name (assuming that
they have a SE license).  This is because in such states it is assumed
taht you have your PE license as you MUST have a PE license before you can
get your SE license.  For me, I have a PE license in Washington and just
learned that I passed (finally) the Struct III exam so I also have my SE
license there.  So, in the "eyes" of Washington, I am "Scott Maxwell, SE"
which also directly implies that I call also be "referred to" as "Scott
Maxwell, PE, SE".

3) There is one state that has both a Practice Act PE license and a
Practice Act SE license.  That state is Illinois.  A PE license in
Illinois does someone who wants to only practice structural engineering
(i.e. does not want to do any general civil engineering stuff) absolutely
no good.  To practice structural engineering in Illinois, you MUST have a
SE license.  So, if you also want to practice general civil engineering,
then you must also obtain your PE license.  So, you can have some people
in Illinois who only have a PE license and thus would only have a PE after
their name.  You can have others who only have a SE license and thus only
a SE after their name.  And you can have others that have both and will
have both a PE and a SE after their name.  For me, I am licensed in
Illnois as a SE but not as a PE (I could easily get my PE license there as
it is direct reciprosity from my Michigan PE license) as a PE license has
no value to me (I have no desire to general civil work).  So, in the eyes
of Illinois, I am "Scott Maxwell, SE".

As a result, I use "Scott Maxwell, PE, SE" as it handles the state
(Michigan) where I only have a PE license (and there is no such thing as a
SE license) as well as other similar states in which I might get licensed
in the future AND it handles those states where I have my SE license (as
well as potentially my PE license).

HTH,

Scott Maxwell, PE, SE
Adrian, MI

On Mon, 31 Jan 2005, jwknospam wrote:

> In some jurisdictions there are two different licenses Ė Structural Engineer
> and Professional Engineer (everything but structural).
>
>
>
> In Missouri there is no difference.  I passed the Structural Engineering I
> (SE I) exam and they called me a PE.  Anyone who passes the Civil
> Engineering PE exam is also called a PE.
>
>
>
> In Illinois, you take the civil exam to be a PE and the two structural exams
> to be a SE (the SE I and SE II).  Iím licensed as a SE in Illinois, but
> cannot be licensed as a PE without also taking and passing the Civil
> Engineering exam.
>
>
>
> So, technically, Iím a PE in Missouri and a SE in Illinois, so my title is
> Jason W. Kilgore, PE, SE.
>
>
>
>    _____
>
> From: Yi Yang [mailto:YI(--nospam--at)summit-sr.com]
> Sent: Monday, January 31, 2005 2:07 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: OFF TOPIC - SE / PE initials
>
>
>
> I've seen engineers using SE, PE initials together, or just SE, such as John
> Doe, S.E. or John Doe, S.E., P.E.
>
>
>
> Which one is more proper, or doesn't really matter?
>
>
>
> Y i   Y a n g,   S. E.
>
> STRUCTURAL DIVISION
>
> SUMMIT ENGINEERING INC.
>
> 707.527.0775.x15
>
> Santa Rosa, California
>
>
>
>
>
>
> --
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>
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>

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