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RE: Wheeling Roof Purlins?

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This is neat.  I have heard about them, but I have yet to run across them in
any of my retrofit/renovation/rehab projects.  I do understand the concept,
though I don't know where to find any design/analysis information.  I did a
quick internet search and found nothing, other than Wheeling-Pittsburg and
Wheeling-Nisshin, Inc, both producers of sheet metal.  However, there are
ways to analyze this sort of thing and having a slight conservative
approach.

What you are getting is a truss-type of beam, seeing as how there are holes
through the web.  The web acts like the internal diagonals in a standard
truss.  In punching the holes, it reduces section weight, however, it
doesn't effect the strength severely.  Utilizing the parallel axis theorem
to get a section modulous and assuming 33 ksi material (the lower material
strength for cold formed steel), the analysis is pretty straight forward for
bending.  You will probably have to make a couple of assumptions for the web
analysis, but it shouldn't be too difficult.  Just a truss analysis, albeit
on a smaller scale, should get the job done.  It isn't outside the realms of
possibility.

A parallel to this is the Boise Cascade wood floor joists (lumber top and
bottom chord with a OSB web).  They have guidlines in their product manual
that allows holes to be cut through the web, as to what size, how often, and
where the "no-no locations" for cutting are.  I believe your "Wheeling Beam"
runs under the same principle.  That might be another place to check out for
a little bit of technical data, however, I don't know how much it will be
able to give you.

It's not the response that you wanted to hear, but I hope that it will help
none the less.  Good luck in your analysis.

Dave Maynard, PE
Gillette, Wyoming

> -----Original Message-----
> From: Brian S Bossley [mailto:BSBossley(--nospam--at)venturaengineering.com]
> Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2005 2:27 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: Wheeling Roof Purlins?
>
>
> I'm looking at a building built in mid 1971 that calls out Wheeling
> 12JP12 purlins, showing a section that shows a 12" built up beam with
> holes punched through the center of the web plate at an even spacing of
> about 2'-0".  It looks like a thin gauge web plate with 1 1/2"x1
> 1/2"x1/8" double angles as the top and bottom chord.
>
> Anybody seen anything like this?  Where can I get design info on
> something like this?
>
> Brian S. Bossley, PE
> Ventura Engineering
> 7610 Olentangy River Rd.
> Columbus, OH 43235
> (614) 847-1110 x121
>
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