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To Dennis Wish[Fwd: Ground Snow Loads]

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Alan Greatorex,

        What you use is not a "computer program" to determine snow loads, but rather an "information system" to help locate the base data to which you apply your professional expertise to determine the proper snow loads.  This is clearly the best practical way to determine appropriate snow loading particularly considering the resources and expertise you can bring to bear on the problem.

        I didn't intend to offend you when I suggested caution be exercised in using a "program" that could determine snow loading from so little input as longitude, latitude, and elevation.  I just wanted to alert people that there were more variables involved.

        Tell me, do you maintain data for locations outside of the United States?  And do you make it available to non Americans such as myself (a Canadian)?  If so I would like to keep your letter on file for future uses.

Regards,

H. Daryl Richardson

"Greatorex, Alan R ERDC-CRREL-NH" wrote:

> Mr. Richardson:
>         The program that we've developed doesn't use just those values. It uses those values to locate the appropriate NWS and NRCS stations within a certain radius. Then three of us do individual analyses of the resulting table of 2% annual probability of exceedance values (otherwise known as 50-yr values): taking into account the maximum observed load at each sstation, and the station's length of record, with more weight given to the longer period of record stations. We then reach a consensus on the final load value that we will recommend when we do case studies. Most of the time people use the ASCE 7-98 map, which we developed in a very similar manner.
>
>         We have noticed exactly what you describe; in the Coastal Ranges, the Rockies, and here in the Appalachians. I've taken to calling it a 'snow shadow'. Even in the data there is an obvious orographic influence on the snow depths and laods in the areas with which you're familiar.
>
> Alan R. Greatorex
> Civil Engineering Technician
> USArmy Cold Regions research and Engineering Laboratory
> 72 Lyme Road
> Hanover, NH 03755-1290
> Phone: 603-646-4210
> FAX: 603-646-4640
> E-mail: Alan.R.Greatorex(--nospam--at)erdc.usace.army.mil
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Daryl Richardson [mailto:h.d.richardson(--nospam--at)shaw.ca]
> Sent: Friday, October 25, 2002 11:01 AM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: Re: Ground Snow Loads
>
> Harold,
>
>         This program could be suspect if the only input is latitude, longitude,
> and elevation, particularly in some areas of the Rocky Mountains.  There are
> come areas very close to Idaho that I'm familiar with where snow on one side of
> the mountain may be three or four times what it is on the other side of the
> mountain despite latitude, longitude and elevation being virtually the same.
>
>         Never-the-less, this would be a good program to have.
>
> Regards,
>
> H. Daryl Richardson
>
> "Sprague, Harold O." wrote:
>
> > Contact the snow gurus:
> >
> >         Michael O'Rourke -
> > http://www.eng.rpi.edu/dept/civil/html/faculty/orourke.html
> >
> >         Alan R Greatorex
> >         USACE Cold Regions Research and Engr Lab
> >         Hanover, NH 03755-1290
> >         voice: 603-646-4210
> >         e-mail: Alan.R.Greatorex(--nospam--at)crl02.usace.army.mil
> >
> > Alan has developed an computer program that gives 50 year snows when you
> > input the latitude, longitude and elevation.
> >
> > Regards,
> > Harold O. Sprague
> >
> > > -----Original Message-----
> > > From: KEVIN THOMPSON [SMTP:kevinmatthewthompson(--nospam--at)hotmail.com]
> > > Sent: Wednesday, October 23, 2002 4:14 PM
> > > To:   seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> > > Subject:      Ground Snow Loads
> > >
> > >
> > > I am a graduate student at the University of Idaho in structures and am
> > > currently doing research on snow loads for the entire state of Idaho. As
> > > part of the research, I'm investigating how nearby states have determined
> > > appropriate ground snow loads. I was hoping you could provide me the name
> > > of
> > > the publication(s) used for determining ground snow loads for the states
> > > of
> > > Utah, Nevada, and Wyoming and where I could obtain or borrow a copy. Do
> > > these states rely soley on information provided by ASCE 7-98? If so, what
> > > publications are used for design where "case studies" are required? Thanks
> > >
> > > so much.
> > >
> > > Kevin M. Thompson
> > >
> >
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