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RE: Ceiling deflection damage caused by excessive snow - who is responsible

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Absolutely yes!  Just because your sphere of influence is beyond the property line doesn’t eliminate the influence.  We deal this issue frequently in Utah.  We have in killed additions to projects because it wasn’t practical to deal with the snow drift on an adjacent property.  Usually there is a work around; however, this is not a trivial question.

 

Jake Watson, P.E.

Salt Lake City, UT

 


From: Rhkratzse(--nospam--at)aol.com [mailto:Rhkratzse(--nospam--at)aol.com]
Sent: Friday, March 04, 2005 6:22 PM
To: h.d.richardson(--nospam--at)shaw.ca; seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Ceiling deflection damage caused by excessive snow - who is responsible

 

In a message dated 3/4/05 5:09:58 PM, h.d.richardson(--nospam--at)shaw.ca writes:

One possibility: a higher building could have been built after the subject building and it should become the second building owner's responsibility to reinforce the roof of the older building.


Really?  You mean when a new high rise is built in Chicago, Denver, etc., that owner "should" reinforce all of the surrounding lower building roofs?  I find this difficult to believe. 

Or when I build a second story onto my home I "should" have to strengthen my immediate one-story neighbors' roofs? 

Ralph Hueston Kratz, S.E.
Richmond CA USA