Need a book? Engineering books recommendations...

Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

Re: Ceiling deflection - comments to Bill P.

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
Dennis:

Actually the snow load isn't published in the code per se; you do have to contact the building department.

Neil Moorre, S.E.


At 01:57 PM 3/6/2005, Dennis S. Wish, PE wrote:
Bill Polhemus wrote:
Rhkratzse(--nospam--at)aol.com wrote:

Isn't this called incompetence?  What's the use of having a building department if they don't catch something as basic--and serious--as this?
With respect--and I do mean that--that's a very strange concept, that the building department is supposed to "catch" problems like this.

The reason it seems strange to me is that whatever "building department" you might find in the various municipalities around here is likely to be staffed by someone who once worked summers in high school for his uncle, the carpenter, and knows how to use a tape measure (although it's been awhile).


The fact is that the EOR can only know what is published in the code. If there is a local municipal requirement, then it should be written out and even a high school freshmen if hired for the position (although I think 17 is the minimum age for municipalities) should be instructed to hand out the design documents for the area. Ralph is correct - when the building official does not make the design information available (he is paying for it if he is not the plan check authority) then it is incompetence and is a serious failure to communicate the design criteria to the professionals.

If you live in an area that is predominantly or completely prescriptive, then the local municipality must modify that section of the code to accommodate special conditions. To do other wise is incompetence.

Dennis

--

Dennis S. Wish, PE
California Professional Engineer
Structural Engineering Consultant

dennis.wish(--nospam--at)verizon.net


760.564.0884 (office - fax)

This e-mail is intended to be delivered only to the named addressee(s) and may contain information that is confidential and proprietary. If this information is received by anyone other than the named addressee(s), the recipient(s) should immediately notify the sender by e-mail and promptly delete the transmitted material from your computer and server. In no event shall this material be read, used, stored, or retained by anyone other than the named addressee(s) without the express written consent of the sender or the named addressee(s).