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RE: beach front construction materials

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When I was at Myrtle Beach last year, I noticed that just about all of the
houses directly next to the ocean were on piles.  The piles extended above
the ground acting like stilts for the house.  This allowed any potential for
a high water situation to not completely wash away the entire house.  This
might be something to consider, elevating the house that is.  I believe it
was approximately 20 feet of exposed large timber pile above grade.  Well,
that's what climbing all of those stairs felt like.  And it makes sense
because there were two flights of stairs and one landing, with the UBC/IBC
stairway requirement of 12 vertical feet of stairs for a landing.  As far as
materials, I couldn't speak for them, however, it appeared to be wood type
construction, however, I could be wrong.

That's all the experience that I have had with beach front property.  It was
a nice house too, with lots of rooms, spacious kitchen and dining room.
Also, all of the rooms had their own bathroom, with one room on the main
floor having a shared bathroom with the living area.  Not that that helps
with your situation, but it's information worth sharing if he is bringing
you in for some floor plan design advice as well.

Sorry I can't be of more help.  There just aren't that many beach front
houses going up in Wyoming.  *grins*

Dave Maynard, PE
Gillette, Wyoming


> -----Original Message-----
> From: Mark D. Baker [mailto:shake4bake(--nospam--at)earthlink.net]
> Sent: Monday, March 14, 2005 2:57 PM
> To: seaint
> Subject: beach front construction materials
>
>
> Any comments on type of materials used for beach front residential
> construction that are resistant to the climate?
>
>
>
> On a current 2 story project our client (a very succesful commercial
> contractor) want to eliminate all wood by using cmu walls, metal stud
> partitions, barjoist - metal pan - lt.wt. conc. floor, metal
> truss roof. As
> we are getting into project, the entire structure will need a caisson
> foundation system supporting structural slab and the materials described
> above. We are now looking for alternative superstructure materials which
> aren't so darn heavy due to the impact on foundation system.
>
>
>
> We are now thinking of a structural steel vertical/lateral system with
> infill for walls. The question is, metal studs, engineered lumber, or just
> what for infill would be good to achieve owners desire of climate
> durability.
>
>
>
> If metal studs, every time you cut a stud or drill a screw you are
> compromising the electroplating so..
>
>
>
> If engineered lumber, just how well would Timberstrand studs stand up to a
> beach climate compared to stick lumber..
>
>
>
> At this point I'm fishing for ideas, past experiences, etc.
>
>
>
> Thanks,
>
>
>
> Mark D. Baker
>
> Baker Engineering
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
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>
>
>
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