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RE: Cylindrical Tank Liquids

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You might want to put a caveat on your plans about the seismic stuff and let the buyers assume the risk. By the time you spend what you need to for seismic loads, they may not be that affordable. I used to live near Ketchikan, AK and had one of these in my backyard, using roof drainage as my water supply. My wife and I put a 5000 gallon wood tank together (twice, because it leaked so badly the first time), and later on we bought a smaller version and used it as a hot tub with an immersion heater fired with wood. At the time, you could still get redwood, but your client may be using treated fir. You might want to verify whatever he is using is currently approved for potable water.
-----Original Message-----
From: Avicpeng [mailto:vicpeng(--nospam--at)telus.net]
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2005 9:26 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Cylindrical Tank Liquids

It's small, only 14ft dia x 8ft, and it's the baby of a local entrepeneur who sells them to the rural population.  I did one for him a long time ago and we didn't address the seismic issues of it then. 
 
The reason I want to review all design aspects, this time around, is that he proposes to re-sell the same design over and over.
 
Thor
 
 
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2005 9:22 AM
Subject: RE: Cylindrical Tank Liquids

Sorry, no pictures. I was working for FEMA under contract at the time, and all the shots were polaroids that got turned in with the damage assessments. Just curious, but how big is the tank and why are you using wood?
-----Original Message-----
From: Avicpeng [mailto:vicpeng(--nospam--at)telus.net]
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2005 9:12 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Cylindrical Tank Liquids

I figured so, but I like to do my due diligence and all that stuff :^)  It has been suggested that I provide for a wall around the base of the tank for slippage (and spill?).  It seems to me that I might as well expect it to collapse under design forces.
 
BTW, do you have any photos of the ones you saw?
 
Thor
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, March 15, 2005 8:53 AM
Subject: RE: Cylindrical Tank Liquids

Wood stave tanks are not worth much for seismic resistance. After Loma Prieta, I observed several that went over like a pile of jackstraws. The only shear resistance between the staves is friction, and typically the base connection is slim to none. The base shear equations in the AWWA standards should also be used with care, because a wood tank isn't exactly ductile. If you must use wood, then you will need a decent anchorage system, which is tough because you have all those steel hoops around the bottom, and you would have to line the inside with some sort of membrane to create the desired shear capacity in the wall. Good luck.


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