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RE: Mortar Testing

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Bill,

Hey, questioning it good.  It keeps you on your toes and always learning.

FWIW, take a look the NCMA TEK note for grout (9-4).  It does contain that
figure but also has a good verbal explanation of the method.

And TEK note 9-1A talks about mortar for those asking about mortar
testing (including the discussion how ASTM C780 is for field testing and
how it DOES NOT contain any requirements for minimum compressive strength
of field mortar).

Scott


On Tue, 5 Apr 2005, Bill Allen, S.E. wrote:

> Scott-
>
> Yes, I recall seeing that configuration (1994 UBC Standards??), so I now
> know what you are talking about.
>
> I guess I'm just questioning everything these days.
>
> T. William (Bill) Allen, S.E. (CA #2607)
> ALLEN DESIGNS
> Consulting Structural Engineers
> http://www.AllenDesigns.com
> V (949) 248-8588	 .	 F (949) 209-2509
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Scott Maxwell [mailto:smaxwell(--nospam--at)engin.umich.edu]
> Sent: Tuesday, April 05, 2005 3:30 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: RE: Mortar Testing
>
> Bill,
>
> In case you have are not aware, when you test grout, the grout sample
> should be made by using masonry units as the form.  This is generally
> done with a pinwheel type configuration of the masonry units so that a
> hollow square shaped section is left in the middle.  Building paper or
> such is used as a bond breaker between the grout and the masonry units.
> This configuration allows the masonry units to absorb a lot of the water
> from the grout much like what will happen in the field application (i.e.
> the actual wall is building).  The masonry units are then stripped away
> (after the grout has sufficiently cured) leaving just the grout test
> sample.
>
> I believe that Arvel also mentioned this method along with a proprietary
> form that could be used instead.
>
> I can get you a sketch/figure that illustrates what I described above if
> my previous blather is not clear.  Or if you locate a copy of NCMA's TEK
> Note 9-4, there is a figure in it that shows it (NCMA TEK notes are
> available online through their website, I believe).
>
> HTH,
>
> Scott
> Adrian, MI
>
>
>
>
>
>
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