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RE: Seismic joint

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I don’t think so. The seismic joint is provided to allow two structures to move independently. There is no relative movement at grade.

 

T. William (Bill) Allen, S.E. (CA #2607)

ALLEN DESIGNS

Consulting Structural Engineers

http://www.AllenDesigns.com

V (949) 248-8588

F (949) 209-2509

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Will Haynes [mailto:gtg740p(--nospam--at)hotmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, April 07, 2005 2:52 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Seismic joint

 

Should a seismic joint supposed to extend through the foundations between two buildings as well? 

 

For instance I have an existing building wall on a continuous turndown edge. I want to put the new wall 3" off of the existing.  At the foundation level, should this gap also exist between the existing and new footings or can the new foundation be poured directly up against the existing?

 

If a gap is required, I don't see this really being effective since dirt and other debris will fill the gap over time between the 2 buildings, if not by the end of construction.

 

 

Will



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