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RE: Residential Engineering Text Recommendations?

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This is a great stack of good advice.  If I can add my $0.02, I would also recommend the following texts:
 
1.  "Residential Structural Design Guide" by the NAHB Research Center, Feb. 2000. www.nahbrc.org
2.  "Shake Table Tests of a Two-Story Woodframe House" by CUREE, Pub. No. W-06.  www.curee.org
3.  "Details for Conventional Wood Frame Construction" by the American Forest & Paper Association, 2001.  This one's FREE!!
 
I often find residential buildings to be more of a challenge than many commercial buildings, but just remember that the same principles of engineering mechanics apply:  You'll still need to get your loads into the ground.  Most jurisdictions, including California (finally), have adopted, or are planning to adopt, the International Residential Code:  Study it thoroughly.  Take advantage of prescriptive framing, but don't hesitate to engineer any portions that NEED to be engineered (those portions that do not meet the restrictions for prescriptive framing) or those that you have determined SHOULD be engineered.
 
Good luck!
 
Dave K. Adams, S.E.
Lane Engineers, Inc.
Tulare, CA
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Stanley E Scholl [mailto:sscholl2(--nospam--at)juno.com]
Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 9:08 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Cc: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org; bill.lilly(--nospam--at)califliving.com; tomo(--nospam--at)odcengr.com
Subject: Re: Residential Engineering Text Recommendations?

Besides prior advice you will need to study the Building Code for several hundred hours and perhaps take a course re the Building Code in your geographic area. Also you may want to offer to help someone who is doing residential to learn more quickly.
 
Stan Scholl, P.E.
Laguna Beach, CA
 
On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 21:38:29 -0700 John Turner <jdkjt(--nospam--at)pacbell.net> writes:
well said, I would add James Ambrose book, 'Simplified Building Foundations'.  It is pretty straightforward, introduces you to basic soils, the reactions, and assumptions you pretty much need to make to deal with building departments.

When he said a good set of plans, that includes truss calcs (usually by others), and all the wonderful framing details that holds things together.  Learn to rely on other professionals, listen to manufacturer's reps, but remember they are selling something.

John Turner, CE, EE, LS
California Living & Energy

look at our web page at   www.califliving.com

Jake Watson wrote:

If I was starting from scratch, I would want three books. To start, give me
a book from Breyer and a copy of the Architectural Graphics Standards.

There are two versions of Breyer's book available.  He wrote one himself and
is co-author of a second (pick one, you don't need both).  Breyer's book
will teach you the basics of wood design and the AIA book will show you how
all the pieces fit.  The AIA book is quite pricey, but very useful for
understanding basic framing methods.  It also includes a great many
"standard" framing details.

Lastly, get a Simpson Strong Tie catalogue.  They are free off the internet.
Once you get it you will understand.

Once you have the books, ask a friend for a good set of house plans as a
reference.  There is much more to residential than meets the eye.

Jake Watson, P.E.
Salt Lake City, UT

P.S. Search the archives, this has come up many times.

-----Original Message-----
From: Randall Moore [mailto:ranmoo(--nospam--at)yahoo.com]
Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2005 7:13 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Residential Engineering Text Recommendations?

I have worked for many years performing Structural
Engineering for heavy industrial clients, but have the
opportunity to do some more diverse work in the
Residential realm.  Does anyone have any
recommendations for text books / reference guides
associated with Residentail Design / Construction?

Thank you

Russell Morgan, PE, SE
 

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