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RE: Radiant tubing in elevated slab

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next] The system I have experience with is Insul..Deck. It too is styrofoam with light gage joists in it so that it only has to be shored at about 5' on center. They, unlike others, will only sell if there is an engineer at the other end specifying the rebar and approving the shop drawing. I will be useing these in my house along with ICF's.

Jeff Fertich, PE
Gettysburg, PA

From: "Michael L. Hemstad" <hemstad.ml(--nospam--at)tkda.com>
Reply-To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Subject: Radiant tubing in elevated slab
Date: Thu, 28 Apr 2005 13:41:43 -0500

David Maynard wrote:

"There is a contactor here that uses a product called "Lite-Deck" which
is a
styrofoam form (reinforced with 2 light gage channels).  The profile is
a
monolithic ribbed flooring system that is both insulated on the bottom
face
and can be reinforced for extra strength..."


Along the path where I walk my dog every day, there is a house whose
owner decided to use this system to add a garage with a basement under
it to his house.

He made the excavation, laid the block walls, and placed the forms.  He
proudly showed them to me; they made concrete joists with maybe 10 inch
stems, and each 24 inch wide piece had two 6 inch light-gauge studs cast
into it.  For handling, I thought.  For strength, he thought.  He laid
them across his walls, dropped a number 4 bar in each groove, laid some
light mesh over the top, backed the truck up, chuted the concrete onto
the floor, and dropped the whole thing into his nice new basement.
Nobody explained to him that you still have to shore it up every 3 or 4
feet.  Two months later he tried it again, this time with a forest of
2x4 posts and beams in his basement.

House looks pretty nice now.  I don't know who told him how big a rebar
to put in, or what the load capacity is.  The idea of homeowners casting
reinforced concrete structures just doesn't seem right to me, but
apparently the building official didn't mind.  I also don't know how the
fire official dealt with the exposed styrofoam ceiling.  Maybe the
homeowner sheetrocked it; maybe he didn't.

Mike Hemstad

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