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RE: Wood design values for old structure

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Harold wrote:
"100 years ago in Southern Missouri"

Harold, is this from personal experience?

-----Original Message-----
From: Harold Sprague [mailto:spraguehope(--nospam--at)hotmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, May 19, 2005 7:56 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Wood design values for old structure


100 years ago in Southern Missouri, they used small local lumber mills
(Oak 
of various subspecies), and they also brought lumber in by train from
big 
mills.  The big mills that supplied Southern Missouri in the early
1900's 
were primarily in Eastern Texas (Southern Yellow Pine).

First get the species identified by sending a sliver to the Forest
Products 
Research Lab.
http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/
Forest Products Laboratory
One Gifford Pinchot Drive
Madison, Wisconsin 53726
(608) 231-9200

The sample is fairly small.  I have had them identify lumber for me from
all 
over the world.  They do it for FREE!!  But there is a limit on how many

they will do for you for free in a given year.

Once the species is known, go to the grading rules agencies for that 
particular species (NELMA, NSLB, NLGA, WCLBA, SPIB, etc.).  You can
visually 
grade it as good as most professional graders.  I would then contact the

grading rules agency for an assessment of allowable stresses vs. the
period 
of lumber you are grading.  Then knowing the size of the timber, the
use, 
and the species, you  can determine the allowable stresses.

Call the FPL and cruise their web site.  They are a wealth of
information, 
and if you pay taxes, they already work for you.

Regards,
Harold Sprague




>From: "Bruce Holcomb" <bholcomb(--nospam--at)brpae.com>
>Reply-To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
>To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
>Subject: Wood design values for old structure
>Date: Thu, 19 May 2005 12:38:39 -0500
>
>We are looking at a building built about 100 years ago in SW Missouri
>and are wondering what strength values we can use to analyze the wood
>framing.  There is a lot of Oak in this area, so the framing may be Oak
>(that was once somewhat common), but other likely species we might
>encounter would be Doug-Fir, Southern Pine, D-F-L and S-P-F.  Does
>anybody have any values for old wood we can use for analyzing the
>joists, beams, studs and columns in this old structure?
>
>
>
>
>
>Bruce D. Holcomb, PE, SE
>
>Structural Engineer & Vice President
>
>Butler, Rosenbury & Partners
>
>319 North Main, Suite 200
>
>Springfield, MO 65806
>
>417-865-6100
>
>417-865-6102
>
>

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