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RE: Poured in Place Slab vs. Raised Floor

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You mean 5000 psf not psi.

 

The typical way to do this is a slab on-grade with monolithic turned down footings. The problem with slab-on grade for a residence is plumbing. As long as the contractor is careful and remodels are unlikely, the slab on-grade is just as easy. Seismically, there is little impact you do gain some rigid-ness, but nothing like a mat slab. The slab on grade also eliminates the venting issues of the crawlspace and is much less labor intensive. Just make sure they put in the weakened plane joints so the slab doesn’t crack all to hell. If the soil is not expansive, you shouldn’t have much of a problem (i.e. cracking floor tiles from slab movement).

 

-gm

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Kevin Polin [mailto:KevinPolin(--nospam--at)Cyberonic.com]
Sent: Sunday, June 05, 2005 2:49 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Poured in Place Slab vs. Raised Floor

 

Group,

 

I have a LOT and the geologist gave us a soil bearing capacity of 5000 psi for the conventional footings, this is in southern California, Eagle Rock Area.

 

One of the structural engineers that I spoke with asked me if I wanted to use a poured slab on grade or a raised floor. I told him a poured slab on grade. I assume that in the case of a high seismic area or an earthquake, a reinforced poured slab would provide better protection than raised floor; this is because of the poured slabs monolithic nature.

 

The footing would be supporting a concrete ICF house.

 

Can someone give me their professional opinion on this?

 

Thanks

Kevin

 

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