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RE: Lt wt. conc topping for exterior decks

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Yes I forgot to put in 10x10 in the wwf note.

 

This is from Trus-Joist website for Garage Slabs with recommend 3” due to heavy cyclic loads from SUV’s:

 

16" On-Center Joist Framing 1. Two layers of 23/32" PS1 Exterior grade Sheathing panel with a 48/24 span rating or two layers of 23/32" PS1 Exterior grade Single Floor panel with a 24 o.c. span rating. Joints should be staggered between layers, with face grain applied perpendicular to joists for both layers. 2. 23/32" PS1 Exterior grade Sheathing panel with a 48/24 span rating or 23/32" PS1 Exterior grade Single Floor panel with a 24 o.c. span rating. With either subfloor, use a topping layer of 3" concrete reinforced with 6" x 6" 10/10 wire mesh.

 

I have done several retrofits of decks in this area. Almost all have 1 ½” light weight concrete topping. None had any noticeable wide cracks. Most interiors in older hotels or radiant floors also have 1 ½” based on the drawings I have had the pleasure of seeing over the years…

 

I guess this seems to be a non-structural thing that the architect should get a handle on rather than me. Any thoughts on Perlite / Vermiculite or gypsum stuff?

 

-g

 

-----Original Message-----
From: GSKWY(--nospam--at)aol.com [mailto:GSKWY(--nospam--at)aol.com]
Sent
:
Tuesday, June 14, 2005 7:01 AM
To:
seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Lt wt. conc topping for exterior decks

 

In a message dated 6/14/2005 8:00:01 AM Eastern Standard Time, gmadden(--nospam--at)maddengine.com writes:

"2" LT WT. CONCRETE TOPPING SLAB (NO COARSE AGG.) w/ W6x6 WWF o/ 3/4"

I guess I would second Rick's comment and say that a 2 in. thickness is likely to crack extremely badly,  unless there is a superhuman effort made to ensure proper curing.  (I.e. checking the burlap every hour to make sure it is still moist.).

 

But I also think your specification is in trouble because it is not clear what you mean.  Typically (at least what I have seen on the east coast), light weight concrete is light weight coarse aggregate (something like expanded shale),  along with sand. 

 

Is it common practice in California to also use light weight fine aggregate?

 

The WWF call-out is also missing some pieces, although maybe everybody but me knows what you mean ....

 

 

Gail Kelley