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RE: Arch. Desktop / Revit Structure

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next] Bill,

Several times on this list you have requested information on software wanting something free or cheap (recently regarding PT design software for one). Many other engineers have expressed the same desire.

If a software developer has a market of hundreds or possibly a couple of thousand license sales he cannot be expected to spend millions of dollars on development for minimal return.

If you want really good full featured software then you have to expect to pay for it. And if the market is small then it will cost a lot because the development costs have to be recovered, not shareware rates which you normally want to pay.

When was the last time you provided fully detailed drawings for photocopy prices!


At 09:10 AM 15/06/2005, you wrote:

From: Yi Yang [ mailto:YI(--nospam--at)summit-sr.com]
Sent: Tuesday, June 14, 2005 5:20 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Arch. Desktop / Revit Structure

Arvel,
 
I believe Revit STRUCTURE is a new product. 
 
http://usa.autodesk.com/adsk/servlet/index?siteID=123112&id=5523763
 

 
Kind of interesting to realize that "PC" software is finally, just now, getting to the point where integrated design/model packages like RAND-MICAS or MICASPLUS (on Intergraph CLIX) were back in the late 1980s on the *nix distributed workstation platform.
 
This isn't a case of the hardware capability finally catching up--we've had "PC" hardware and networking capabilities on a par with those old *nix VAR systems for seven or eight years now.
 
Rather, it's the case of the SOFTWARE side catching up. It's probably because the effort involved to come up with CAE systems at this level just haven't had the profit potential.
 
"Back in the day" when Intergraph was selling these large-scale MicroVax-based engineering workstation systems--minicomputer host systems, networking, graphic CLIX workstations, and training, price of all that specialized hardware was more than worth the price of admission. And that price was very large indeed.
 
A typical medium-sized engineering office could expect costs approaching one million bucks.
 
These companies made a killing on the hardware. There was none of the industry standardization of hardware that we take for granted today (even in the case of the processors, all but a very few are "compatible" with the Intel standard). There was a lot of innovation and "we have what the others don't". And systems like CATIA were VERY much tailored to the industries in which they were used.
 
Lots of government money going around--Intergraph got quite stupidly rich off government & military contracts for their systems, which were so ubiquitous in that market that to this day Microstation is the de facto standard for highway and transportation engineering where it doesn't come close anywhere else.
 
Anyway, with the kinds of software products that we use almost become "commodities"--heck, I saw a full copy of Autocad 2006 sitting ON THE SHELF at Fry's Electronics in Houston--hypothetical developers cannot charge the confiscatory rates that once were the rule, and so they don't seem to have the incentive to "port" a lot of these sophisticated CAE systems to today's platforms.
 
I've been amazed at the capbilities that much of the software we use DON'T have compared to what we used in the Golden Age of CAE in the 1980s.
 


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Regards  Gil Brock
Prestressed Concrete Design Consultants Pty. Ltd. (ABN 84 003 163 586)
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