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RE: Old Concrete

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Cinder Concrete is most likely one that used cinders from steam locomotives (black little stones left over from burning coal) instead of stone aggregate. I would be concerned about compressive and shear strength. The forerunner of concrete block was cinder block which was made with cinders. The term "Cinder Block" hung on long after it had actually been used, in fact occasionally you might even hear it today.

Gritcrete might be one with extra sand broadcast on the surface for slip resistance. Just a guess. Might also be a "product" during that era.

Jim K.

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Polhemus [mailto:bill(--nospam--at)polhemus.cc]
Sent: Monday, August 15, 2005 9:26 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Old Concrete


> I am working on some projects rehabilitating older historic buildings from
> the 1920's.  There is some terminology in the original construction
> drawings
> that is a little confusing.
>
> Tar Concrete

I'm almost certain that's what we today call "Asphaltic Concrete" of the
type used even now for roadway surfacing.

> Gypsum Concrete

Sounds like good ol' "Gyp-crete":

http://www.johnbridge.com/vbulletin/archive/index.php/t-1804.html

> Cinder Concrete

Hm. Could this be the "ancient" equivalent of our modern Portland Cement
concrete with fly-ash added?

Don't know.

> Gritcrete

The only thing I can think of is "sand-lightweight concrete" or concrete
with fine aggregate only.

>
> Any clarifications on strength, unit weight and uses would be helpful.
> Thanks in advance.

Depends. You can probably consult someone at e.g. Wiss, Janney, Elstner
(http://www.wje.com/) or Construction Technology Laboratories
(http://www.ctlgroup.com/) to give you a quick-and-dirty range for these.

However, if you're looking to do actual construction or renovation,
retaining these materials you need to engage a firm to do the testing and
come up with "real" numbers for this.

Depends on your application.


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