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RE: Typical Stud Size for Embedded Plate

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Deformed Bar Anchors are essentially weldable rebar. They have the dimple on the end and are shot on just like a headed stud.

I have specified weldable rebar in the past, but you really have to be on top of that one. A706 (truly weldable rebar) is still not that commonly available. If there are small lots (like with embeds), A706 is pricey and you may not have it in your schedule. You must request the mill certs, and you must verify that they were the same bar welded in the shop. You will then get the argument that A615 is weldable. It can be if the proper procedures are used. Most shops will not preheat correctly, and again you have to get the certs in order to know the CE and get the proper pre-heat and procedure.

I bitched about this in the field to an old project superintendent. I told him that the welds were brittle and a third could be knocked off with a hammer. He handed me a hammer and told me to go ahead and try on a newly delivered frame with rebar embeds. Each one I whacked made a pinging sound as it fractured and went flying after one "fat boy" (too long at the desk) blow with the hammer.

I have just seen it too many times in my 30 years of engineering and field work.

I don't want to go to court, and be grilled as to why the hell I allowed rebar to be welded in the field. If I ever allow rebar to be welded in the field these days, I demand the certs, I verify that the bar in the field matches the certs, I require submitted written welding procedures, and full time inspection.

Or I can require DBA's and go home and have a beer.

Regards,
Harold Sprague





From: "Bruce Holcomb" <bholcomb(--nospam--at)brpae.com>
Reply-To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Subject: RE: Typical Stud Size for Embedded Plate
Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2005 11:35:55 -0500

Harold,
Why to recommend not welding rebar to the embed plate?  I don't design
many heavily loaded connections which might need rebar, but I've
approved many on shop drawing submittals.  Other than requiring weldable
rebar, are there other problems?


BDH

-----Original Message-----
From: Harold Sprague [mailto:spraguehope(--nospam--at)hotmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, August 18, 2005 11:14 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Typical Stud Size for Embedded Plate

Rich,

If it is lightly loaded you could go down to 1/4" studs with 1/4" plate.
I
like to use the same thickness of plate as the studs.  (That is not an
absolute, but it keeps me out of trouble)  Precast and tilt-up is
generally
heavier, and I would not use it as an example of a light connection
plate.
You can use either studs or "deformed bar anchors".  Both can be shot
on.
Do not weld rebar to plates.  Use "deformed bar anchors" (DBA's).

Check out:
http://www.studwelding.com/
http://www.nelsonstudwelding.com/literature.htm
for standard sized of studs or DBA's.

I like to allow at lease 2" on the side for misplacement of the embed
plate.
  If you have the room, you can add a couple of #4's in each direction
parallel to the embed plate to intercept the failure plane of the shear
cone.

Regards,
Harold Sprague





>From: "Rich Lewis" <seaint03(--nospam--at)lewisengineering.com>
>Reply-To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
>To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
>Subject: Typical Stud Size for Embedded Plate
>Date: Thu, 18 Aug 2005 09:21:51 -0500
>
>I'm looking to embed some plates in a concrete foundation wall to
support
>some lightly loaded steel beams.  I would like to use headed studs
welded
>to
>a plate.  What is the typical size of stud used for embedded plates?
What
>is typically used in precast or tilt-up panels for most common plates?
Is
>there a typical detail for rebar added in the local area of the studs?
>
>
>
>Thanks!
>
>
>
>Rich
>
>
>

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