Need a book? Engineering books recommendations...

Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

RE: Foam/Epoxy Injection

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
Nels,
Thanks for your input.  After talking to Delta Plastics, it seems that for this type of wall, the foam would not be effective, because there isn't much room for it to expand (to become foam).  They did recommend to try just epoxy injection.  Apparently a lot of waterproofing contractors can do this work.  I still have doubt about it because it seems to be difficult to fill the voids in the rubble between wythe.
 
I have been looking at this Cintec product recently.  Have you seen it in action?  I've been talking to their engineers about the feasibility of using this on my project.  It seems to make more sense to me.  Basically they drill a hole from top of the wall and insert steel reinforcing (rods, tubes) and wrap the reinforcing in a long sleeve (they call it a sock), and fill the sock with their special grout.  The sock will expand and fill some voids.  They will also drill from the side in a diamond pattern to stitch the two wythe together, using the same technique.  This grout seems to be easier to work with than epoxy, and sympathetic to the original material.
 
 
 
Y i   Y a n g,   S. E.            
STRUCTURAL DIVISION
SUMMIT ENGINEERING INC.
707.527.0775.x162
Santa Rosa, California
 


From: Nels Roselund [mailto:njineer(--nospam--at)att.net]
Sent: Monday, August 01, 2005 8:58 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Foam/Epoxy Injection

Yi,

 

I?ve designed and observed tests of the Delta Plastics Epiceram [which seems to have been renamed BISFOAM-3A&B] for use for improving the out-of plane seismic response of 2-wythe unreinforced brick walls with a continuous separation between wythes.  The foam was used to fill the separation and bond the two wythes together.  For H/t out-of plane response, we concluded that the assembly would respond to out of plane shaking as a single wall of thickness equal to the sum of the 2 wythes plus the separation.  Without the foam, it would have acted as two independent walls of thickness equal to a single wythe thickness.  

 

I would be skeptical of the foam being effective for improving the in-plane seismic response.  Perhaps in bonding two wythes together, it would help to transfer in-plane shear loads applied to the inner wythe by diaphragm shear bolts through the wall to engage the outer wythe.  I doubt that the foam would be effective for improving the shear capacity of a wall in which the wythes were already bonded together.

 

Nels Roselund, SE

South San Gabriel, CA

njineer(--nospam--at)att.net


From: Yi Yang [mailto:YI(--nospam--at)summit-sr.com]
Sent: Monday, August 01, 2005 6:43 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Foam/Epoxy Injection

 

This might be a long shot, but does anyone have any experience using BISFOAM-3 A&B (http://www.deltafoam.com/), for seismic retrofit of old stone building?  Owner doesn't want to see any steel frames or shot-crete walls on this old stone building.  Epoxy injection?

 

Thanks for any comments.

 

 

 

Y i   Y a n g,   S. E.            
STRUCTURAL DIVISION
SUMMIT ENGINEERING INC.
707.527.0775.x162
Santa Rosa, California