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Re: CMU Wall Rigidity

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Hi Gary,
 
I believe what you can do in this case, is use the method with some more approximation.   For example, you can take the height of the strip upto the highest opening.  After that, pay attention to boundary conditions assumed (cantilever or fixed).  The portion of the wall above the openings such as above the door (lintel) that does not satisfy the boundary conditions would not be able to fully participate in transferring the shear load (although can still act as a sort of an infill in certain locations).  Those portions that satisfy the conditions, can be used to calculate the rigidities as the piers with appropriate boundary conditions.
 
Alternatively, if time permits, a Finite Element Analysis may be performed. 
 
-Chitra
 
 
 
Gary Grinstead <Gary.Grinstead(--nospam--at)ci.stockton.ca.us> wrote:
Chitra.....thanks for the reference. It's quite useful but unfortunately has the same limitation as my other references in that their examples place the openings at the same elevation. My main problem is how to use the (solid wall) - (strip w/openings) + (piers) method when the openings aren't at the same elevation. For example, in the drawing on page 12 of the referenced document, increase the window height so it extends the same 2'-8" above the door that the door extends below the window. That is the situation I'm having trouble with.

Gary Grinstead


>>> cdeshpan(--nospam--at)yahoo.com 9/8/2005 6:16 AM >>>
Hi Gary,

You may find some very useful information in this report regarding your CMU wall rigidity question.

-Chitra

http://www.usace.army.mil/inet/usace-docs/armytm/tm5-809-3/chap7.pdf





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