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Re: Field welding

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I don't necessarily agree it is a good point.

If reasonable steps are taken on the part of the engineer to ensure that
proper welding is occuring (i.e. random inspection of a certain number of
field welds either during welding or after welding with certain tests),
then why would an engineer lose their license for a contractor's error?
If such were the case, then standard practice would be for ALL engineers
to have about million (OK, so just a wee bit of an exaggeration)
inspectors out there who report to and are hired by the engineer but which
costs are included in the engineers contract.  To my understanding,
engineers lose their license cause THEY made a mistake in the design phase
or did not employ a certain standard of care in preparing the construction
documents...not cause the contractor was a moron who could not do things
correctly.  Now, I am not really sure if a field weld calcs out using
non-reduced values (i.e the full normal allowables rather than the 50%
reduction of normal weld allowables) but the engineer requires no
inspection/review of any welds if that would or would not meet a minimum
"standard of care".   I do know that from my experience it is general
practice to have at least some of the field fillet welds inspected in some
manner (could just be an inspector watching the fillet weld operation to
something more "substantial") and usually most, if not all, the
full/partical pen welds inspected.

Scott
Adrian, MI


On Fri, 9 Sep 2005, Bill Polhemus wrote:

> Jordan Truesdell, PE wrote:
>
> > Yeah, the EOR can require a reduction be taken. It may not be common,
> > but it is his/her license on the line if it fails.
>
>
> See, that's a great point.
>
> To me, telling the erector that "you can field weld, and no one's going
> to bother REALLY inspecting it, and we're just going to ASSUME it works..."
>
> Well, that takes the incentive to due diligence right out of it, doesn't it?
>
> N.B. I suspect that a large number of contractors--sadly, I don't feel
> confident enough to say "most"--will do what is right no matter what the
> engineer says. But there are far too many that don't give a rip. And
> those are the ones we have to prepare for.
>
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