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RE: concrete topping? on metal deck over timber structure.

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Again, I agree.  I probably wouldn’t suggest the system for a floor at the interior, although I can see what might be some advantages with an exterior deck.  Probably no unintentional collector problems there.

 

Kind of a side note…whenever I think of putting a concrete topping on a plywood surface I think of when my wife put stucco over plywood for a couple of fake towers around a gate in our yard.  I tried to get her to put some mesh or something over the plywood, but what the hell, I’m just a structural engineer, what would I know.  Anyway, in a couple of days you could pull the stucco off the plywood in large sheets.  Of course it had to be redone.  Is there some sort of bonding agent that is used when a topping is applied to a plywood floor surface?

 

Joe

 

 

Joseph R. Grill, P.E. (Structural)

Shephard - Wesnitzer, Inc.

Civil Engineering and Surveying

P.O. Box 3924

Sedona, AZ  86340

PHONE (928) 282-1061

FAX (928) 282-2058

jgrill(--nospam--at)swiaz.com

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Jordan Truesdell, PE [mailto:seaint1(--nospam--at)truesdellengineering.com]
Sent: Wednesday, December 14, 2005 12:19 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: concrete topping? on metal deck over timber structure.

 

If your concrete turned to dust, the structure would be safe. In my book, that meets the intent of the code.  However, it would be prudent to check and make sure that the composite action would not result in an unintentional compromise of the floor system, and that the actual diaphragm action didn't overload - or create unintentional - collector elements which might result in a progressive failure of the structure.

Jordan

Joe Grill wrote:

Recently there was a thread concerning concrete slab supported on wood framing.  Realizing that the code allows a concrete topping I believe not more than 4” thick, I thought of a hypothetical situation which is a bit interesting for discussion.

 

Assume a client wants to support a composite metal form deck (with reinforced concrete topping) with wood joists.  The total thickness of the deck and concrete would not be greater than 4”.  This would be a composite system therefore structural.  However, if the metal deck itself, due to the close spacing of the joists, can support the dead and live loads, then it really doesn’t matter if the system is composite or not.  It seems that although it is a composite system, it could also be considered as a deck with a concrete topping and therefore could be supported by wood joists.  Also assume for a moment that for some reason the deck does not need to transfer lateral loads as a diaphragm.

 

Any thoughts?

 

Joe Grill

Joseph R. Grill, P.E. (Structural)

Shephard - Wesnitzer, Inc.

Civil Engineering and Surveying

P.O. Box 3924

Sedona, AZ  86340

PHONE (928) 282-1061

FAX (928) 282-2058

jgrill(--nospam--at)swiaz.com

 

 

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