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RE: Pipe Support Forces for Transient Flow

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The project I recently reviewed did include slow closing valves and controls to minimize water hammer - but even if these are reasonably effective, the anchor needs to be designed for "something".   "Evaluate slugging forces on a project basis and control movement with directional guides and anchors" and "use a percentage of piping MAOP" all sound good - but the point is that without a detailed transient analysis, there is no known force to design by.  I've proposed 20% of maximum operating pressure as an unbalanced pressure at bends as a "minimum" where there are some controls to minimize water hammer effects.
 

William C. Sherman, PE
(Bill Sherman)
CDM, Denver, CO
Phone: 303-298-1311
Fax: 303-293-8236
email: shermanwc(--nospam--at)cdm.com

 


From: Scott, William N. [mailto:William.Scott(--nospam--at)veco.com]
Sent: Thursday, February 16, 2006 1:24 PM
To: 'seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org'
Subject: RE: Pipe Support Forces for Transient Flow

Bill,
 
Most valves shut slowly, reducing the "water hammer" effect that you see on typical sink valves. We control the pressure wave by using timed valve closing rates.
 
You can use a percentage of piping MAOP if you can not control the valve closing rate.
 
Most piping systems have slugging forces that depend on the fluids that result in high forces and can lift the pipe from the supports. Evaluate slugging forces on a project basis and control movement with directional guides and anchors.
 
Bill