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RE: AUTOCAD: What's Your Preference?

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For what is worth, my experience with CADD files (it has been while) is
along the lines of what Gerard does.  From my experience, this is how
large A/E firms tend to work (at least the firms that I worked at in my
past life).

This is partly due to the way that large firms would use Microstation
(this was prior to AutoCAD making their XREF function worth a damn).  For
large projects (i.e. a bunch of people working on CAD files) this has the
advantage that not everything is one file in which only one person can
work at a time.  For a small firm (one person or several people), working
within one file is much easier to do and thus using XREFs are not nearly
as common from my experience.

Regards,

Scott
Adrian, MI


On Wed, 1 Mar 2006, Gerard Madden, SE wrote:

> Bill,
>
> In regards to the printing setups, that's no different, I have the same
> 4 (just 4 different printers installed in autocad - the 24x36 and 30x42
> are plot to file (plt) and I email those to the blue printers) The 11x17
> is a physical printer in my office and the PDF is what it is.
>
> My use of sheet files S1.1 etc... which simply collects the the
> S-FLR1.dwg, scales it to 1/48 and xrefs a border (all in model space)
> accomplishes the same thing as others use Paperspace for (a printing
> file). I do all clouds on this file where others have mentioned they
> cloud and delta things in paperspace. The benefit to this, is from job
> to job, I can copy these files into a new folder, and simply reload all
> the xrefs (floor plans, borders etc...) for the new job and all I do is
> hit batch plot and I'm done.
>
> When something changes, I go to my bare bones A-FLR plans I created. I
> xref overlay the architects background, find out where the differences
> are (because odds are they didn't cloud it for me) and I stretch the
> geometry to match his and I'm done with that part.
>
> As far as tracking the loads, that part is necessary in either method.
> If someone likes to fake a dimension (ie. Type in the dimension and not
> use the actual scaled dimension) then this is a problem, yes. I do not
> do this however, I always adjust...
>
> I'm not familiar with the scripts and layer manager you currently use,
> so I can't help you with usefull comments. I have found that scripts
> generally work pretty good, but we're a hassle to make and keep current,
> but that was on ACAD 13 I last used scripts, so maybe it's easier.
>
> No problem on this files, only took 5 minutes.
>
> -gm
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Bill Allen [mailto:T.W.Allen(--nospam--at)cox.net]
> Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 12:04 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: RE: AUTOCAD: What's Your Preference?
>
> Gerard -
>
> Well, your method certainly solves the publishing issue, but it seems
> like
> to me that it's more difficult drawing in three different files than it
> would be to draw in one file. I realize I'm not as familiar with your
> method
> as you are, but what happens if (actually, when) something changes? You
> then
> have to XREF the structural plans to make sure things (loads) "track"
> all
> the way down.
>
> Personally, I still like drawing in one plan file and switch views by
> manipulating layers. My question was relative to printing/publishing
> efficiently.
>
> If I don't change the way I draw (of course, I could if I can be
> convinced
> it's the best way to go), I see four ways of printing/publishing my plan
> sheets:
>
> 1. The current way, which is to print them individually after running
> Layer
> Manager.
> 2. Do a "save as" once I've run a layer manager to save the plan file as
> a
> foundation plan, second floor framing plan and roof framing plan. Once
> I've
> got that, then I can run my publishing routing which I hopefully saved.
> 3. XREF my plan into new drawings which are used for plotting only. The
> down
> side is that I would have to check each file when/if I create a new
> layer.
> 4. Create layout tabs for each plan view. Currently, I have layout tabs
> set
> up only for different printers. I have one for a full size print (24x36
> or
> 30x42), on for my rack set (11x17) and one for PDFs.
>
> Currently, it seems to me that option 2 is the easiest, but I am hoping
> that
> there might be a better way.
>
> Thanks for your time to send me your files to help explain your system.
>
> Regards,
>
> T. William (Bill) Allen, S.E.
> ALLEN DESIGNS
> Consulting Structural Engineers
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Gerard Madden, SE [mailto:gmadden(--nospam--at)maddengine.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 11:10 AM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: RE: AUTOCAD: What's Your Preference?
>
> Bill,
>
> What I do is start at the roof.
>
> I have a base file of the each floor plan that just contains the walls
> from the architect (I blow out all their text, notes, everything, except
> the physical linework of the building). So in a 2 story building I would
> have the following files:
>
> A-Roof
> A-Flr2
> A-Flr1
>
> I start with my roof plan structural drawing S-Roof.dwg
> - 1st: I xref in the A-Roof drawing, and I go to the layer dialog box
> and set all the colors to a grey (to fade them out). I will dash the
> lines that are under the roof framing (i.e. bearing walls) and make the
> walls that penetrate or form the parapet continuous).
> - 2nd: I insert a block file that is a roof plan of the job I just
> finished. This gives me most of the things I need (text styles, dim
> styles, std. notes, layers). I move it to the side grab what I need and
> I erase everything else and I PURGE ALL to the file.
> -3rd I start the roof plan
>
> Then I go to the second floor plan.
> - 1st: I xref the ***S-Roof.dwg*** I was just working on into the file.
> When I do this, I brings in the s-roof file, everything I just drew, and
> also brings the A-Roof file that was embedded in the file.
> - 2nd: I go to the layer dialog box. The layers are sorted
> alphabetically as you know, but the ones that are part of the x-ref's
> are sorted. I go to the S-ROOF\layers... and freeze all of them except
> the column layer since that penetrates down to this floor. I go to the
> A-Roof/layers .... and shut off what I don't need (i.e. penthouses) and
> change the linetypes to all continuous.
> - 3rd: I xref in A-FLR2 background, and do the same layer manipulations
> (i.e. dash lines for bearing walls and walls under this finished floor
> line).
> -4th : Insert a block of the 2nd floor plan on a previous job and
> repeat...
>
> Same on the foundation/1st floor plan... What this does is gives you an
> accurate plan alignment for the structure so you can carry down the
> columns/post, keeps the layers easily manageable (without any special
> ad-on programs), and lets you quickly create these files.
>
> The first few times will be cumbersome, but after that, it's like second
> nature and very easy. It's especially helpful in residential when walls
> do not stack and you need to come up with cross beams, beams supporting
> shearwalls etc....
>
> Hth, probably confusing over email...
>
> -gm
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Bill Allen [mailto:T.W.Allen(--nospam--at)cox.net]
> Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 10:51 AM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: RE: AUTOCAD: What's Your Preference?
>
> 1. Model Space. I know Autodesk originally encouraged using PS for all
> annotations, but I've briefly worked in that environment and it is not,
> IMHO, an easy format to manipulate and view information on a particular
> model.
>
> All annotations (dimension, detail bubbles, leadered text, notes, etc.)
> associated with the model goes in Model Space. I put general notes,
> shear
> wall schedules, etc. in Paper Space.
>
> I don't work in 3D or in different scales, but if I did, I would create
> a
> dimension style and text style for each and put them on their own layer
> to
> be turned on and off (or frozen and thawed) depending on which view I'm
> working with.
>
> On a related issue, I'm curious about which is the best way to go
> relative
> to managing different levels of the same structure. Currently, I have
> everything related to a structure (except details) in one plan file. I
> XREF
> attach all of the associated architectural (and sometimes mechanical)
> plans
> and draw the structural information on top of them.
>
> To switch between views, I used to (R2000 and before) use script files
> to
> turn on and off layers. Now I use Express Tools' Layer Manager and may
> be
> moving to AutoCAD's Layer States Manager to do this task. The problem
> with
> ET's Layer Manager (and I believe ACAD's LSM) is that if/when I add a
> new
> layer, I have to redefine the views whereas when I wrote script files, I
> could use wild cards and never had to mess with it again.
>
> Now I'm discovering ACAD's Publishing feature of R2006 and like it a lot
> except it doesn't recognize ET's Layer Manager nor do I believe it will
> recognize ACAD's LSM. I have yet to seriously investigate Sheet Sets.
>
> So, if I have a file called PLAN which contains information for S1
> (Foundation Plan), S2 (Second Floor Framing Plan) and S3 (Roof Framing
> Plan), what method would be the easiest/best to use for publishing
> purposes?
>
> Thanks,
>
> T. William (Bill) Allen, S.E.
> ALLEN DESIGNS
> Consulting Structural Engineers
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Polhemus, Bill [mailto:BPolhemus(--nospam--at)wje.com]
> Sent: Monday, February 27, 2006 8:47 AM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: AUTOCAD: What's Your Preference?
>
> (Only answer if you're "modern" and use "Paper Space"):
>
> When annotating drawings with dimensions, notes, callouts, etc., do you:
>
> 1)	Put those in Model space and size them accordingly,
> 2)	Put them in Paper Space, or
> 3)	Have some combination of 1) and 2) that you prefer (please
> elaborate)?
>
> William L. Polhemus, Jr. P.E.
> Senior Associate
> mailto:bpolhemus(--nospam--at)wje.com
> WJE
> Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc.
> Engineers I Architects I Material Scientists
> 10235 West Little York, Suite 245
> Houston, Texas 77040
> P: 832-467-2177 F: 832-467-2178
> http://www <blocked::http://www/> .wje.com
>
>
>
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