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RE: Princeton Review: Update

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Admittedly- the beach thing… But, sick as the process can be at times, I do love the satisfaction of the profession so I’ve decided that my solution to winning the lottery would be to volunteer my services to non-profit organizations for headquarters/outposts/etc…  Still plenty of the usual headaches, probably aggravated by even worse funding issues, and lawyers who see deep pockets- but you can’t beat the opportunity to pick your projects and the good karma!

 

And, Scott & Bill, as a structural engineer married to another structural engineer, I can at least attest that it works for us! But at least his focus is on bridges, and mine on buildings, so the daily “war stories” are a little varied. ; )

 

Michelle Motchos, PE

Stevens & Wilkinson of SC

Columbia SC

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Jeremy White [mailto:jwhite(--nospam--at)holbertapple.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 2:50 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Princeton Review: Update

 

What I want to know is where this brain washing comes from which says structural engineers are expected to work long and hard hours because you do it for the love and personal satisfaction of the job and not the pay.  If I handed any structural engineer, say, $10 million dollars how long would they stay in the career that they “love” so much.  I don’t know any who would.  They’d be off to retire to the beach in a week and became part-time stock market gamblers with their new found wealth.  Am I wrong?

 

Jeremy White

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Polhemus, Bill [mailto:BPolhemus(--nospam--at)wje.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 12:40 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Princeton Review: Update

 


From: SEAINTLIST [mailto:seaint-list(--nospam--at)sbcglobal.net]
Sent: Wednesday, March 01, 2006 11:36 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Princeton Review: Update

 

It is interesting that the average hours per week is 45.  This is probabaly the starting of the SE career, but as we all know, once we get into our career more, we are looking more like 60 hours per week or more.

 


 

I always feel guilty admitting this, but I probably do average closer to the 45 hour mark. I just can’t “get into” working/no life.

 

I know I should be working fifty and sixty hours a week (as a “real Amurcan”), but I can only do that for a week or two, following which I drop back to forty, so it averages out as above.

 

I guess someone has to be an “outlier” on the low side.