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Re: Pipe Supports (Tee type)

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Bhavan Shaw,

56"pipe supported 10 meters in the air is somewhat different than I had in mind when I replied to Teresa's posting earlier. Many of my comments in that posting, although perfectly valid, are not really applicable to this problem.

For this problem you might want to consider an A frame support with a pair of wide flanges say 18x50 or W21x62 with the base five or six feet wide and the webs parallel to the axis of the pipe. If you can't get this in you probably can't get a suitable foundation in either. If you are stuck with a T support you may want to consider a large diameter pipe, like 30" diameter for example, for the vertical member. Note: these sizes are pure guesses; no calculations whatever have been performed; you're on your own for calculations.

       Good luck.

Regards,

H. Daryl Richardson


----- Original Message ----- From: "Bhavin Shah" <bhavin.design(--nospam--at)gmail.com>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Sent: Thursday, March 30, 2006 10:30 AM
Subject: Re: Pipe Supports (Tee type)


Thanks for the reply.

I am also designing the Pipe Stanchion (height of more than 10m)
supporting heavy pipes (2 nos. of 56" dia. pipe). These pipes are
transferring vertical load of 45 Ton. Also, lateral force at the
locations of the pipes are to be considered as per the relative
flexibility of the stanchion (as compared to the Pipe). In the
transeverse direction of the pipe Frame is provided ( 2 nos. of
columns ) and in the longitudinal direction cantilever action is
considered.

Regards,

Bhavin Shah

On 3/30/06, Padmanabhan Rajendran <rakamaka(--nospam--at)yahoo.com> wrote:
I am not aware of any such limitation. Any structure should be strong enough
to support the imposed loads and the deflection should satisfy
serviceability requirements. Nothing wrong in using a cantilever which
satisfies these two criteria. Beyond a certain height, however, a stanchion might become more economical, and this threshold will have to be worked out
on a case by case basis. I recall a project in which I designed a trussed
tower to support a single 36" pipe. The pipe was some 35 feet above ground
level.

Rajendran


Bhavin Shah <bhavin.design(--nospam--at)gmail.com> wrote:

Dear all,

This is regarding design of Pipe Stanchions (Steel structure)
supporting heavy pipes at certain elevations.

For supporting the individual pipes, generally Tee type (cantilever
column) of Pipe Stanchions are used. As the stanchions are flexible in
both the directions, lateral deflection at the top of the stanchion
may be quite high as compared to the pipe displacement. Hence, are
there any limits or general guidelines (say above 7.0m) that above the
particular height Frame type of stanchion should be used.

Thanks,

Bhavin Shah

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