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RE: Reinforcing for Anchor Bolt Breakout

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I never said it wasn't worth it, can't comment there as I haven't read it,
but I certainly can't afford it.  That being said, there is an article from
the second quarter 1983 Engineering Journal from AISC that discusses
reinforcing for shear and tension at the cone.  $10.00 for non-members and
free for members and can be downloaded.
Joe 

Joseph R. Grill, P.E. (Structural)
Shephard - Wesnitzer, Inc.
Civil Engineering and Surveying
P.O. Box 3924
Sedona, AZ  86340
PHONE (928) 282-1061
FAX (928) 282-2058
jgrill(--nospam--at)swiaz.com
 


-----Original Message-----
From: Scott Maxwell [mailto:smaxwell(--nospam--at)engin.umich.edu] 
Sent: Thursday, April 20, 2006 9:03 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Reinforcing for Anchor Bolt Breakout

Uh, now you gone an done it!  <grin>

Honestly, I frankly don't care if you bash ACI or anyone else.  Feel free.
I just get tired of people whining about having to pay for stuff that
costs money to produce.  It cost more to produce that MCP then just the
cost of the that $1 CD...it cost something to pay someone to go into that
layout program and find that word that was deleted/moved/changed and
actually delete/move/change the word and repeat that many, many times for
all the changes no matter how small and THEN proof it all to make sure
that the require/approved changes where done properly and included.  To
try again so show a similar example, I am sure that you don't charge
someone $1 for a new drawing sheet when you had to going and change a
W12x14 to a W12x19 (assuming it was not a typo that required the change
but rather a change in configuration that resulted in a change in loading
that required a redesign of the beam)...you are going to charge that
client more than $1 cause the client is paying you for the engineering
that you do to put the stuff on the paper NOT the piece of paper.

So, unless you charge your clients only for the cost of the paper that
your designs are printed on, I don't see why you might feel the need to
complain about having to pay for more than the phyiscal cost of printing
and shipping a code book.  There is little difference other than in theory
you include a profit in your charge(/fees) while mode code groups don't
since they are non-profit.

So, complain away...but don't expect any sympathy from me when some client
complains about how much money they have to pay you.  As you put it...it
is a free market afterall.

Regards,

Scott
Adrian, MI

On Thu, 20 Apr 2006, Jordan Truesdell, PE wrote:

> Careful, Scott's going to give you a severe tongue lashing if you start
> another round of ACI bashing again.
>
> Which reminds me, how come getting annual updates of the MCP on CD ROM
> are nearly the full price of the annual cost? Does it really change so
> much in a year that $385* for one year or $900* for three years (paid in
> advance) seems like bargain? I mean, they're going to publish it anyway,
> right? And a CD costs less than a dollar...it's not like I'm asking for a
> 20lb delivery of dead tree. Besides, most of the content is just "fixing"
> what they were wrong about in the last publication, right? (I mean, if
> they'd done the research properly in the first place, they wouldn't need
> to fix it, would they.)**
>
> *member price. I joined for this year so I could replenish my 10 year old
> ACI standards. Seems like there should be some super-secret membership
> co-op for those of us with small offices who do "everything" just so we
> can afford all the paper, and CD-ROMS, we need to function.
>
> **I'm kidding. They can charge anything they want. Its a free market.***
>
> ***I'm still kidding.
>
>  Jordan
>
>
> Joe Grill wrote:
>
>       And for the low low price of $265.00.
>
>
>
>       Joseph R. Grill, P.E. (Structural)
>
>       Shephard - Wesnitzer, Inc.
>
>       Civil Engineering and Surveying
>
>       P.O. Box 3924
>
>       Sedona, AZ  86340
>
>       PHONE (928) 282-1061
>
>       FAX (928) 282-2058
>
>       jgrill(--nospam--at)swiaz.com
>
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Smith, Edgar [mailto:eesmith(--nospam--at)burnsmcd.com]
> Sent: Thursday, April 20, 2006 9:20 AM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: RE: Reinforcing for Anchor Bolt Breakout
>
>
>
> The "PIP STE05121 Anchor Bolt Design Guide" uses hairpins or
> additional straight rebar next to the anchor bolts to do this.  PIP
> stands for Process Industry Practices.  The guide is based on App D
> 318-02.
>
>
>
>
>
____________________________________________________________________________
____
>
>
> From: Haan, Scott M POA [mailto:Scott.M.Haan(--nospam--at)poa02.usace.army.mil]
> Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2006 6:15 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: RE: Reinforcing for Anchor Bolt Breakout
>
> I thought ACI appendix D is meant for unreinforced concrete.  It
> seems logical that if the concrete has to pop out past
> horizontal reinforcement that the shear friction the horizontal
> reinforcement produces could be used to resist the pop out and that
> if the pop-out happens adjacent to vertical reinforcement that you
> could count on the strength of the steel developed above and below
> the pop-out to resist the pop-out.
>
>
>
> I have not seen this is a design guide but I have seen engineers do
> it.
>
>
>
>
>
____________________________________________________________________________
____
>
>
> From: Rich Lewis [mailto:seaint03(--nospam--at)lewisengineering.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2006 12:46 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: Reinforcing for Anchor Bolt Breakout
>
> Are there any practical ways to reinforce a footing for concrete
> breakout of anchor bolts as defined in ACI appendix D, section
> 5.2?  If Break Out is the controlling factor in the design of the
> anchor, and I don't want to design the footing thickness based on
> anchor bolts, what would be a reinforcing configuration to
> strengthen the breakout capacity?
>
>
>
> Thanks for any insight.
>
>
>
> Rich
>
>
>
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