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RE: Exam prep hp33s calc

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You know Walter...I don't know what Scott told you (I don't have 3 hours to read his novels)...but my suggestion would be to pick out the calculator you are going to use on the test and work a ton of practice problems with it.  That way you get familiar with it.
 

~ ELI

-----Original Message-----
From: Walter Don DeVore, Jr. [mailto:wdevore(--nospam--at)cavity-wall.com]
Sent: Saturday, April 29, 2006 7:21 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Exam prep hp33s calc

Scott Maxwell wrote:
Is proficiency with the calculator of prime importance for PE exam problems? Does one learn the calculator and then the problems or problems then the calculator? Is the Kaplan program as good as any other?
 Thanks
Walter:

To my knowledge, all states use the NCEES exams for the PE level exams for
the "primary" exam at least (some states will supplement those exams with
a/some state specific exams such as California's seismic and surveying
exams).  For most states (and it appears that New Mexico is one of them
based upon their webiste), structural oriented people getting their PE
will take the NCEES Civil PE exam.  Some states will allow or even require
those who specialize in the area of structural engineering to take the
NCEES Structural I PE exam.  And as I mentioned in the parenthesis above,
it appears that New Mexico is a state that just requires or uses the NCEES
Civil PE exam.

The Civil PE exam is an 8 hour, multiple guess exams (sorry, don't much
"approve" of multiple choice exams for this type thing).  The 8 hours is
divided into two 4 hour sessions - the morning session, which is called
the "breadth exam" and the afternoon session, which is called the "depth
exam".  The "breadth exam" (the morning session) "...contains questions
from all five areas of civil engineering: Environmental, Geotechnical,
Structural, Transportation, and Water Resources." (quoted from the NCEES
website)  The "depth exam" focuses "...more closely on a single area of
practice in civil engineering.  Examinees must choose one of the following
areas: Environmental, Geotechnical, Structural, Transporation, and Water
Resources." (again quoting from NCEES website)  The NCESS website at the
following location will offer more details, including detailed list of
topics, study materials and design standards:

http://www.ncees.org/exams/professional/pe_civil_exams.php

The NCEES Structural I PE exam is formatted basically the same as
mentioned above for the Civil PE exam, except that is ALL on structural
topics.  As such, it does not really have a "breadth" and "depth"
portion, so to speak...at least not in the same way.  You can get detailed
topic information at the following NCEES website:

http://www.ncees.org/exams/professional/pe_structural_1_exam_specs.pdf

As to your specific question, first I would suggest that you contact the
New Mexico board and ask them if you will be required to take the Civil PE
exam or the Struct I exam.  Since they just offered the exams last week,
you must be starting to study for the fall, which means that you have
PLENTY of time to call them and ask them (unless they changed the testing
date to this weekend or something else).  The answer to that question will
start you off in the right direction rather well.

If you are required to the Civil PE exam, then I believe it is much less
likely that you will see a bridge question (at least that requires
detailed knowledge of the AASHTO code) and even if they do, it will likely
be only one or two questions (i.e. very few) and as such missing it may
not be the end of the world (this gets into priorities when studying...in
other words, where can you get the most "bang for your buck" so to speak
when studying).  You will, however, need to study MUCH more than concrete
structures.  You will need to study many non-structural topics (see the
above website).  Beyond that I am not all that much help, as I took the
Civil PE exam back under the "old" format when the morning session was
"short answer essay" problems (i.e. you write out solutions and could get
partial credit) and the afternoon sessions was 40 multiple guess questions
and they did not do this "breadth" & "depth" stuff.

And even if you are required to take the Struct I PE exam, while you will
likely see some bridge problems, they will likely again be few and far
between...although much more likely than the Civil PE exam.  But again,
you will DEFINITELY need to study more than concrete structures as the
Struct I exam covers structural analysis, steel, concrete, masonry, and
wood...mainly for buildings, but some problems will be bridge oriented.

If you ever reach the point where you must/want to take the NCEES Struct
II exam (i.e. to get you SE license in some states such as California,
Washington, Illinois, etc), then you will be taking an exam that gives you
the choice between taking a building oriented exam or a bridge oriented
exam.  If you choose the bridge oriented exam, then you will DEFINITELY
see specific bridge problems that require detailed knowledge of the AASHTO
code.

There are lots of PE exam study materials out there that will help you
study...or at least get you some feel for the types of questions that you
will see.  This website is a good source for study guides:

http:/www.ppi2pass.com

HTH,

Scott
Adrian, MI


On Fri, 28 Apr 2006, Walter Don DeVore, Jr. wrote:

For preparing to take the PE exam for New Mexico, is bridge design part
of it or can one focus only on concrete structures? Or are structures one
session and the bridge the other.  Thanks

Jnapd(--nospam--at)aol.com wrote:
      Try this set


KaplanAEC Engineering Product Details


Joe Venuti
Johnson & Nielsen Associates
Palm Springs, CA

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