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Re: retail center lateral system (3 sided masonry)

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Brian,

As I understand your structure you are using the north and south walls to resist loading from the east or west directions; and you are using the west wall to resist wind loading from the north or south directions. If so your roof system must be able to transfer horizontal loading; the question is "Can it transfer enough?"

       Here are a couple of suggestions you may wish to consider.

1.) Strengthen the diaphragm as necessary. This could include thicker metal or a concrete topping. 2.) Add cross bracing in the roof plane. Either L or T steel shapes could be used.

I think number 2 above is probably the most economical. I would try that first.

I agree with Brian Smith that it should be possible to make the three wall system work; however, I haven't done the calculations; you have!

Regards,

H. Daryl Richardson

----- Original Message ----- From: "Brian" <bsh117(--nospam--at)yahoo.com>
To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
Sent: Tuesday, May 09, 2006 8:21 AM
Subject: retail center lateral system (3 sided masonry)


I need some help to settle an office dispute.

Currently we have a 1-story retail center project in
our office.  The building is rectangular and approx
300 ft running in the NS direction and 90 ft in the EW
direction.  The entire East face of the building is
storefront glass (300 ft) and wraps about 20 ft on the
North and South faces.  The rest of the building,
which consists of the entire West face and the
remaining portions of the North and South face, is
contructed out of 8" masonry.  The roof is constructed
of joists, joist girders and metal deck and there are
interior steel columns and steel columns at the
storefront to support.

Our differences come about for the lateral system in
the long direction of the building.  My co-worker
would like to design this building without a lateral
frame on the East face and rely entirely on the
masonry shear wall on the West face.  However, I
believe that a lateral frame is required because I do
not believe the metal roof deck can transfer the
entire lateral force in that direction to the West
face of the building.

We are mainly dealing with lateral forces due to a
basic wind speed of 90 mph.

I would appreciate any other opinions out there.

Thanks!
Brian


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