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Re: axial braking load for bridges

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Chris-

I was referring to the bathroom scale example to show the effect of braking.............the braking of a truck will add to the lateral load (logintudinal) on the bridge.

cheers
Bob

On 5/18/06, Chris Towne <ctowne(--nospam--at)chaptech.com> wrote:
Daryl,
 
Thanks for the clarification.  I have a hard time getting my point across with just email.  I just figured nobody knew what in the world I was talking about.
 
Have a good day.
 
Chris Towne
-----Original Message-----
From: Daryl Richardson [mailto:h.d.richardson(--nospam--at)shaw.ca]
Sent: Wednesday, May 17, 2006 6:31 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: axial braking load for bridges

Chris,
 
        I'm sorry.  I didn't intend to imply that the vertical forces increased due to braking other than through the standard impact factor application.  Use of the work "braking" in Scott's question automatically caused me to think that he was asking about the horizontal force due to braking which could be up to the coefficient of friction (+- 70%) times the weight of vehicles engaged in a panic stop.
 
Regards,
 
H. Daryl Richardson
----- Original Message -----
From: Chris Towne
Sent: Wednesday, May 17, 2006 9:09 AM
Subject: RE: axial braking load for bridges

Dynamics really never was my thing, but how does braking increase the vertical load of the truck?  Sure it will change the distribution of the loading in the front and rear axle, but not the total vertical load.  The resultant force in breaking is in the direction of travel (horizontal), not vertical.
 
Chris Towne
-----Original Message-----
From: Daryl Richardson [mailto:h.d.richardson(--nospam--at)shaw.ca]
Sent: Wednesday, May 17, 2006 1:56 AM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: axial braking load for bridges

Scott,
 
        I can't answer your question about where in the code the stopping load is but 25% to 30% may not be enough.  It might do in combination with a lane load governing situation but if a single truck governs you should probably consider a panic stop for the truck.
 
        Panic stop breaking generates about 70% of the vertical load for stopping force.
 
Regards,
 
H. Daryl Richardson
----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 6:22 PM
Subject: axial braking load for bridges

I have a old structural engineering manual and I thought I read in there that it said that bridge foundations need to be designed for an axial breaking load equal to 25% or 30% of the live load neglecting impact.  Is this right?  Where is this located in the AASHTO Bridge Design Specifications.
 
 
Thanks.
Scott.