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Re: Bow String Truss

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You're living too close to the Canadian border.
Gary
> Maxwell Diagram, eh? 

> Scott
> Adrian, MI
> 
> 
> On Wed, 17 May 2006, Daryl Richardson wrote:
> 
> > Scott,
> >
> >         You're on the right track, Scott.  We used to do just that back when
> > I was a new graduate.  We even took it to the next step and drew vector
> > force drawings (to scale, of course) and could thereby solve for all of the
> > member forces in a truss.  Generally this was faster than many people today
> > could enter the co-ordinates and member connectivities in a computer
> > program.  The downside, of course, was that the procedure had to be repeated
> > from the beginning for each load case.
> >
> >         You may be interested in knowing (in case you didn't already know)
> > that the resulting vector diagram was called a Maxwell Diagram.
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > H. Daryl Richardson
> >
> > ----- Original Message -----
> > From: "Scott Maxwell" <smaxwell(--nospam--at)engin.umich.edu>
> > To: <seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org>
> > Sent: Wednesday, May 17, 2006 2:29 PM
> > Subject: Re: Bow String Truss
> >
> >
> > Seeing as I was never a Boy Scout, I am going to offer up what you likely
> > intented, but just not in "Boy Scout" language...why not just use trig
> > stuff.  If you go a measured perpendicular distance to the
> > truss span horizontally on the ground from the truss location and then
> > sight up to the top and bottom of the truss and measure the angle of those
> > sight lines, you then will have one leg of the triangle and the
> > angle...you can then use trig to get the other leg (at least close enough
> > likely for what you need).  This would get you the height to the bottom of
> > the truss and the top of the truss.
> >
> > We did this back in high school to measure heights of trees and buidlings
> > and signs.  And in reality, if you took a surveying class you did it with
> > more "accurate" equipment.
> >
> > Regards,
> >
> > Scott
> > Adrian, MI
> >
> >
> > On Wed, 17 May 2006, John Riley wrote:
> >
> > > Can you use an approximation method found in any Boy Scout manual?  Seems
> > > like a visual approximation would be far better than a rule-of-thumb
> > > approximation.  JPRiley
> > >
> > >
> > > Rich Lewis <seaint03(--nospam--at)lewisengineering.com> wrote:              Is there a
> > > standard rise to run ratio that most bow string trusses would use?  I
> > > canâ?Tt find anything regarding this in my text books.  I have a hanger
> > > with a 120 ft. clear span.  I eyeball the truss height at 15-16 feet.  It
> > > would take rental of a lift to verify it.  I want to check the wind load
> > > on the building and would like to find a good approximation of the height.
> > > The truss is fabricated from pipe.
> > >
> > >   Thanks for any insight you may be able to give.
> > >
> > >   Rich
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > > ---------------------------------
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