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Re: built-up wood beam

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Gary-
The presence of light steel joist hangers does not preclude removal of the beam. We do it all the time here in Northern California.  You do need to shore each side during the process.  If you are depth limited for the replacement beam, you can go wider by using a sawzall to trim the joist ends to provide the necessary slot and provide new hangers.  It certainly beats trying to guess at unknown properties.
 
Bill Cain, S.E.
Berkeley CA
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Gary L. Hodgson and Assoc. <ghodgson(--nospam--at)bellnet.ca>
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Sent: Tue, 6 Jun 2006 08:02:07 -0400
Subject: Re: built-up wood beam

Bill et al, 
Thanks for the replies. I should have explained that the existing beam has existing joists on both sides supported by light steel joist hangers which makes it almost impossible to remove the existing beam. The job is an addition/expansion of a large high-end house with additional loads now being imposed on the existing solid 9 x 11.5 beam. I don't have most of that information you mentioned as the original designer is an engineer who is taking ultimate responsibility. Under the wonderful world of red tape that we have here in Ontario, I was hired by him as I have passed my code knowledge exam and have a BCIN (Building Code Identification Number better known as a BS no.) which allows drawings to be submitted to a building department whereas he hasn't passed his exams yet. Hence, the situation where I am reviewing these drawings for code conformance but theoretically not for structural adequacy-how do you separate the two? See, it is all BS. I hope he passes his exam on 12 June. I would rather put a steel plate on the bottom fastened with vertical through bolts and not worry about glue, E values, moisture content and surface condition. 
Gary 
 
bcainse(--nospam--at)aol.com wrote: 
> Gary- 
> Have they considered just replacing the beam? By the time you go > through the analysis, specification and construction process it may be > cheaper just to replace it. If you do what is proposed, consider: 
> 1. Is the hardwood plank at same moisture content as beam? (possible > differential shrinkage) 
> 2. What are the relative E-Values of the two wood materials? How will > you determine these? 
> 3. What load are you upgrading from and to? I.e., Is there a change in > loads, an existing defeiciency, an aesthic issue? 
> 4. What type of epoxy and what are the elastic modulus and shear > strength values of it? Some epoxies are more flexible than others and > that may affect how the two members interact. 
> 5. How will quality of the gluing be assured. What controls will you > require to prepare the surfaces, apply the epoxy, cure the epoxy and how > will they be monitored. 
> If you want to feel warm and fuzzy, burn the old beam in the fire on a > cold winter's night and replace it with a new beam! 
> Regards, 
> Bill Cain, S.E. 
> Berkeley CA 
> > > -----Original Message----- 
> From: Gary L. Hodgson and Assoc. <ghodgson(--nospam--at)bellnet.ca
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org 
> Sent: Mon, 5 Jun 2006 08:46:49 -0400 
> Subject: Re: built-up wood beam 
> > List, > > I have been asked to review drawings for a house addition, The designer > has called for an existing beam (9h x 11.25v actual or nominal?) to be > reinforced with a 2" x 11.5" hardwood plank glued on the flat to the > bottom of the existing beam with an epoxy glue. I am assuming the > original beam is S-P-F or Doug Fir as that is pretty standard around > here. No grades or species were given. I have never heard of such a > thing and do not want to comment on it if it is acceptable practise but > it seems strange to me. The house is approximately 20 years old. I'm > just wanting to feel warm and fuzzy about this. > > TIA, > > Gary > > > > ******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* *** > * Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp > * * This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers * Association of > Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To * subscribe (no fee) or > UnSubscribe, please go to: > * > * http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp > * > * Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org <mailto:seaint-ad%40seaint.org>. > Remember, any email you * send to the list is public domain and may be > re-posted * without your permission. Make sure you visit our web * site > at: http://www.seaint.org ******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** > ****** ******** 
 
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