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RE: "Code Approval" (was big dig structural failure - epoxy anchors overhead supporting gravity)

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I worked on an offshore oil project where the accepted Hilti anchor was
discontinued and the company offered an alternate. The anchor was a powder
actuated anchor for fastening grating to structural framing.

It took literally months of back and forth between the manufacturer, the
design team, the jurisdiction authorities, the customer and the insurance
companies to make a decision. Testing and analysis were required.

This kind of due diligence was repeated for every product on the project
that was 'new' to the customer and their insurers.

I have never seen this stance taken for land based structures except for
bridges and never to that degree.

Dave



From: Polhemus, Bill [mailto:BPolhemus(--nospam--at)wje.com] 
Sent: July 18, 2006 4:47 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: "Code Approval" 

Man, I love it when a discussion comes up here that exactly matches a
situation with which I'm currently dealing.

I went to the page you referenced above and found this sentence:

"Evaluation reports on products have been erroneously construed as
making the decision for the code official rather than providing an
independent technical resource from which a decision can be justified."

Now, the great majority of situations where this misconstruing has gone
on, are faits accompli. That is, the engineer's already specified the
product's use, the contractor's already installed it, and no one is ever
going to be one whit the wiser as to whether "proper approval" was given
or not.

However, in my work I deal with the OTHER side of things: There's
already been a problem, and now we're digging into the "how" and "why."
And invariably, I come up with things that were done by my fellow
structural engineers not quite according to Hoyle (or at least the
building official).

What I want to know is: Do you ALWAYS have to get approval for "widgets"
like epoxy adhesive anchors that AREN'T specifically covered in the text
of the model code? That is the kinds of products that the Evaluation
Reports deal with.

If so, how maddening--and how unfortunate for the designer who meant
well all along, but to whom it never occurred to think, "oh, I've got to
make sure the building official approves of this Hilti anchor..."

Comments please.

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