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Re: Lumber Species in Phoenix

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The lumber that is readily available in lumber yards in Phoenix is Douglas Fir.  You can special order the other species
---- bcainse(--nospam--at)aol.com wrote: 
> Rich-
> Try (602) 225-0980 from the website www.homedepot.com .  <ROTFL>
> Regards,
> Bill Cain SE
> Berkeley CA
>  
>  
> -----Original Message-----
> From: seaint04(--nospam--at)lewisengineering.com
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Sent: Tue, 3 Apr 2007 5:48 AM
> Subject: RE: Lumber Species in Phoenix
> 
> 
> Daryl,
>  
> I was hoping asking the question on the List was like calling a local phoenix engineer.  I didn’t expect a simple question to generate such a negative backlash.  Here in East Texas you can only buy Southern Pine No. 2 unless you special order lumber.  I assumed, and maybe wrongly, that there would be a predominate lumber species sold in Phoenix.  I assumed, and maybe wrongly, that it would be Doug Fir, since it is near the west coast.  I would think they would import southern pine, but maybe I’m wrong.  That is why I ask.  I thought Hem-Fir was mostly a north-eastern wood.  I didn’t realize they were on the west coast too.
>  
> All I want to know is what the predominate species of lumber is in Phoenix.  Maybe I should just find a Home Depot to call.  Can anyone give me that number?  :o)
>  
> Rich
>  
> 
> 
> 
> From: Daryl Richardson [mailto:h.d.richardson(--nospam--at)shaw.ca] 
> Sent: Monday, April 02, 2007 4:16 PM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: Re: Lumber Species in Phoenix
>  
> Rich,
>  
>         Why not just phone an engineer in Phoenix and ask?  If this project is a go you'll probably want to retain a local engineer to do at least some of the routine inspections in order to save your client a massive amount of travel expenses.
>  
> Regards,
>  
> H. Daryl Richardson
> ----- Original Message ----- 
> From: David Topete 
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org 
> Sent: Monday, April 02, 2007 12:54 PM
> Subject: RE: Lumber Species in Phoenix
>  
> Or, to say the client a day’s worth of your travel to field verify, assume a very low value of Fb, say 1,000 psi, and MoE,  maybe 1.5e6 psi.  Then, go forward with a very conservative design.  You could even isolate the equipment framing by calling for LVL or PSL engineered lumber, and forgetting that the existing framing is providing support.  Just some thoughts…
>  
> David A. Topete, SE
>  
> 
> 
> 
> From: sscholl2(--nospam--at)juno.com [mailto:sscholl2(--nospam--at)juno.com] 
> Sent: Monday, April 02, 2007 11:45 AM
> To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
> Subject: Re: Lumber Species in Phoenix
>  
> I suggest that you verify blocking,sizes of members, notches, dimensions of supports, allowable deflection, etc. by a visit to the site or else qualify your comments accordingly. 
> Stan Scholl, P.E.
> Laguna Beach, CA
> ________________________________________________________________________
> AOL now offers free email to everyone.  Find out more about what's free from AOL at AOL.com.


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