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Stone House

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Mr. Sprague spake as follows:
 
From: "Harold Sprague" <spraguehope(--nospam--at)hotmail.com>
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Stone house

I struggled with this a while back.  The reality is that structural stone
walls are the oldest building material that there is.  There are stone
structures in seismic areas that have been there for thousands of years. 
The Parthenon is in a relatively high seismic area and is still standing and
it has no reinforcing.  The Great Pyramid at Giza is still standing.  It
also is not reinforced, but rebar wasn't widely used in masonry until the
20th century.

Stone was manufactured a long time ago, but the Manufacturer (note cap) does
not have an advocate in the code development community.  However, the
Manufacturer of stone also created the environmental forces including
gravity that the stone must resist.

Not having an advocate means that there is no representation on the MSJC and
therefore no specific provisions in the ACI 350 nor the building code.  That
said, why can't it be designed as masonry?  You can still put rebar in it,
and you can still determine an f'm.  Design it as reinforced masonry.  After
all CMU is just a lot of stones glued together.  Bricks are very tiny stones
mashed together than cooked.  The code does not specifically preclude
designing with reinforcing in stone.  You just have to do a lot more
engineering without a lot of guidance.

You will also have to use your judgment regarding cover, but it should not
be much different than CMU regarding porosity.

Look on the bright side.  With no specific code on reinforced stone masonry,
who can tell you that you are wrong?  Of course if the Manufacturer tells
you that you are wrong the lightning strike can leave a nasty mark.


Regards,
Harold Sprague



 
From a previous life,  the names of Helen and Scott Nearing come
to mind.  I believe they were so-called experts in this field.
 
 
G. Bunkers