Need a book? Engineering books recommendations...

Return to index: [Subject] [Thread] [Date] [Author]

RE: Copying sealed PE work for personal records

[Subject Prev][Subject Next][Thread Prev][Thread Next]
This didn't use to be that big a problem in the old hand-drawn days.
Employees would have had to stand at a copy machine plowing through hundreds
of archived details when the boss might wandered in and ask, "what are you
doing?".  But now, with the ability to copy vast amounts of intellectual
property that an employee may or may not have had a hand in designing, it is
a particularly vexing problem.

I spend a lot of spare time on detail development (architecturally) and it's
a bit annoying to know that a one time transfer to a flash drive could
literally give away every detail I've ever drawn to anyone with access to my
library.

What steps can be taken to prevent this?  Beats me.  One has to allow
workers access to details, and that's the camel's nose into the tent.

In the end, I've sort of taken the attitude that I just can't waste time
worrying about it. Life's too short.



-----Original Message-----
From: Conrad Harrison [mailto:sch.tectonic(--nospam--at)bigpond.com] 
Sent: Tuesday, April 17, 2007 6:57 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: RE: Copying sealed PE work for personal records

It depends on the agreement with your employer. Some employers require that
you sign an intellectual property agreement, and then there may also be
questions of national security, depending on the types of project you work
on.

In the end however its left to the individuals decision between simple
experience versus truly innovative design. If you worked on something which
was truly innovative, then it maybe risky to use when working elsewhere.
However none the less it does form part of your own experience and therefore
may be able to adapt it with out infringing copyright or other intellectual
property rights. Patents are after all public documents, and as a
consequence some companies protect their designs through secrecy. Secrecy
however doesn't fit in well with public safety.

The other issue to consider is time and cost of materials. Employers may not
like you wasting time producing extra copies of documents. However you
probably require a personal copy for reference in the first place. So it is
a matter of whether your employer will permit you to take such copies with
you.

Mostly however it is a matter of how strongly the employer wishes to protect
what they consider to be their intellectual property. So even if you have
signed an agreement, what it means may not be all that clear and your
immediate managers may not be all that concerned.

As you say most structural stuff is tried and tested traditional stuff, and
not all that innovative, and mostly is shared as a matter of ensuring public
safety. 

So it really depends on the type of work and your employer.

Regards
Steven CONRAD Harrison
B.Tech (mfg & mech), MIIE, gradTIEAust
mailto:sch.tectonic(--nospam--at)bigpond.com
Roy Harrison & Associates
Consulting Engineers (Structural)
PO Box 104
Para Hills
SA 5096
South Australia
tel: 8395 2177
fax: 8395 8477

-----Original Message-----
From: PLD [mailto:pdall2(--nospam--at)hotmail.com] 
Sent: Wednesday, 18 April 2007 08:38
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Copying sealed PE work for personal records

Are you allowed to retain a copy your own sealed work (drawings and/or 
calculations) for your personal records?  What about if you change jobs?  
Can you take a copy of the work you produced with you (assuming it is not 
proprietary)?  Am I not still responsible for the design whether I work for 
Company A or Company B? What if I want to use portions of that design or 
detail in another job with another company.  It seems that there is nothing 
new under the sun especially in the civil/structural world, but what is the 
limit on taking work with you?  Thanks in advance.

_________________________________________________________________
Exercise your brain! Try Flexicon. 
http://games.msn.com/en/flexicon/default.htm?icid=flexicon_hmemailtaglineapr
il07


******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
* 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org 
******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ******** 



******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
* 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org 
******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ******** 


******* ****** ******* ******** ******* ******* ******* ***
*   Read list FAQ at: http://www.seaint.org/list_FAQ.asp
* 
*   This email was sent to you via Structural Engineers 
*   Association of Southern California (SEAOSC) server. To 
*   subscribe (no fee) or UnSubscribe, please go to:
*
*   http://www.seaint.org/sealist1.asp
*
*   Questions to seaint-ad(--nospam--at)seaint.org. Remember, any email you 
*   send to the list is public domain and may be re-posted 
*   without your permission. Make sure you visit our web 
*   site at: http://www.seaint.org 
******* ****** ****** ****** ******* ****** ****** ********