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RE: Using steel chains as concrete reinforcement??

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As long as we're thinking outside the box, what about using the chain to PT
the wall, like Dur-O-Wall's masonry PT system?  You'd have to come up with
some way to stress the chain and lock it in place.  Once it's stressed, you
could grout the cells with reasonable confidence that the chain is centered,
or you could leave it ungrouted, like in Dur-O-Wall's system.

-- Joel


Joel C. Adair, P.E.
Project Manager
the structural alliance, Inc.

-----Original Message-----
From: Jordan Truesdell, PE [mailto:seaint1(--nospam--at)truesdellengineering.com] 
Sent: Friday, April 27, 2007 12:06 PM
To: seaint(--nospam--at)seaint.org
Subject: Re: Using steel chains as concrete reinforcement??

I wondered the same thing at first. Nuts or undiscovered genius? But on 
reflection, this would be an innovative solution for retrofit 
reinforcing of  a un(der)reinforced wall which was below an existing 
floor where there was no access to put a full length of rebar in from 
the top or sides, and an internal stiffener was impractical or would 
require expensive changes to fixes or loss of business use of the area. 

The placement would, indeed, be somewhat problematic, but with a high 
lift grout measured by patty size and a bit of vibration, you could 
probably expect a roughly vertical drop of a sufficiently heavy chain, 
especially if it were placed with a weighted end - say a bar with a stud 
or two - in 1-2 courses of grout for an initial set, then lifted taught 
for grouting.

It would take a special application for this to be cost effective, but I 
can see how there might be a significant savings over invasive 
reinforcement techniques.

Jordan



Stan E Scholl wrote:
> I don't understand why anyone would want to do this unless they had some
> leftover chain since I am quite sure that rebars are much cheaper for the
> same capacity. Furthermore how can proper clearance be assured when the
> chair will move all over when the grout pushes against it?
>
> Stan Scholl, P.E.
> Laguna Beach, CA
>   

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