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RE: Wood interior wall studs

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I would check DL + .75LL + .75LLr with Cd=1.15 and DL+.75LL+.75LLr+.75WL with Cd=1.6. Using Cd=1.6 when an interior partition load is controlling seems reasonable, but I would also like to know that studs can handle just the axial load with a lower duration factor.
 
Wesley C. Werner, P.E.

-----Original Message-----
From: Andy Heigley [mailto:aheigley(--nospam--at)jgaeng.com]
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2007 1:32 PM
To: Seaint
Subject: Wood interior wall studs

Hello all:

 

I just want to get some feedback from other engineers about designing interior load-bearing wood wall studs.  When designing the walls, I normally check two load combinations:

 

1)    DL + LL +LLr

2)    DL +0.75LL + 0.75LLr + 0.75W (with W = 5.0 psf interior horizontal partition load; I typically use a Cd=1.0 if I am just supporting floor live and dead load.  And a Cd=1.15 when carrying roof loads in addition to the floor live and dead loads.  I think the use of Cd=1.6 seems less conservative when you are dealing with large axial loads, particularly in a multi-story buildng.)

 

A contractor is battling me over some stud sizes b/c the stud height is about 10’-0” and for 2x4’s once you add the horizontal loading, in the second combination above, it significantly reduces the axial capacity.  His engineer doesn’t check the second loading listed above.

 

I just want to get some other people’s opinion on what they check in your own design.

 

Thanks,

 

 

Andrew Heigley, PE