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Re: Texas PE

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According to TX B of PE, it's really a legal document tracking.  PDF's and any other non-secure document can be altered.  Also, a non-secure signed stamp can be easily copied.  With the hard, wet-stamped document somewhere near the distributor, as well as others and hard copies, electronic documents can be verified.  Electronically "signed" documents without a record wet stamp that may be forged, are by default, not legal or binding.

>>> Rand W Holtham <RHoltham(--nospam--at)CBI.com> 8/15/2007 2:53 PM >>>
The intention (IMHO) of the anti-electronic signature is that the
responsible Engineer had at a minimum touched the engineered document and
that some other person did not issued the document without the consent of
the responsible engineer. The electronic signature makes rubber stamping
infraction just too easy. So a faxed copy of a seal document is legitimate
as I see it as much as a photocopy of a stamped document is legit.


Rand



                                                                          
             "Jerry Coombs"                                               
             <JCoombs@carollo.                                            
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             08/15/2007 06:44                                           cc
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                                       Re: Texas PE                       
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The original document must be signed, sealed, and *transmitted*.  It may be
followed by a facsimile of whatever sort, but there must be a real paper
trail to the original, to the person distributing them.  One fuzzy area
that is not explicit, but seems acceptable, is to fax a sealed addendum,
correction, etc; but these should really be followed by a hard copy, too.

>>> "Jordan Truesdell, PE" <seaint1(--nospam--at)truesdellengineering.com> 8/15/2007
6:22 AM >>>
I've been away for a bit, and didn't get a chance to reply earlier. Does
this mean that you cannot fax a sealed document? And for the prohibition,
does it apply to sending the document or to the validity of the sent
document?
Jordan


Jerry Coombs wrote:
      If you can't find a blank, I may be able to strip name/ number from
      mine and send.  Keep in mind that it is NOT ALLOWED in Texas, as in
      many states, to transmit a signed stamp electronically.

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